European Coal – EGS Schuetzen http://egs-schuetzen.com/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 12:45:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://egs-schuetzen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png European Coal – EGS Schuetzen http://egs-schuetzen.com/ 32 32 Germany steps up measures to save gas as Russia slows supply to Europe https://egs-schuetzen.com/germany-steps-up-measures-to-save-gas-as-russia-slows-supply-to-europe/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/germany-steps-up-measures-to-save-gas-as-russia-slows-supply-to-europe/ BERLIN — Germany will restart coal-fired power plants and offer incentives for companies to reduce their consumption of natural gas, marking a new stage in the economic war between Europe and Russia. Berlin unveiled the measures on Sunday after Russia cut gas supplies to Europe last week as it retaliated against European sanctions and military […]]]>

BERLIN — Germany will restart coal-fired power plants and offer incentives for companies to reduce their consumption of natural gas, marking a new stage in the economic war between Europe and Russia.

Berlin unveiled the measures on Sunday after Russia cut gas supplies to Europe last week as it retaliated against European sanctions and military support for Ukraine.

These measures, which are part of a broader strategy initiated after the invasion of Ukraine, aim to reduce gas consumption and divert gas supplies to storage facilities to ensure that the country has sufficient reserves to spend the winter.

The gradual reduction in gas supplies from Russia has raised the specter of a potential fuel shortage if Europe enters winter with less than full stowed. It also raised prices, putting additional pressure on economies that are already struggling with high inflation and rising borrowing costs and facing the prospect of a recession.

Nord Stream, the main channel for transporting Russian fuel to Europe, reported a sharp drop in gas supplies.

“It’s obviously Putin’s strategy to shake us up, drive up prices and divide us. We will not allow this. We will defend ourselves with determination, precision and reflection,” said Robert Habeck, German Minister of Economics.

A natural gas storage facility in Germany. The gradual reduction in supplies from Russia has raised the specter of a possible fuel shortage.


Photo:

David Hecker/Getty Images

Gazprom blamed the shortfall on missing turbine parts that were stuck in Canada due to sanctions. European officials and analysts dismissed the explanation.

Germany imports about 35% of its natural gas from Russia, up from 55% before the war, and uses most of it for heating and manufacturing, according to German government estimates. Last year, natural gas power generation accounted for about 15% of total public electricity in Germany, Habeck said, adding that gas’s share of power generation is likely to have fallen this year.

To accelerate the decline of gas in the energy mix, Mr Habeck outlined a number of measures the government was taking to reduce gas dependence and build up reserves for the coming winter.

In a U-turn for a leader of the environmentalist Green Party, which has campaigned to reduce the use of fossil fuels, Mr Habeck said the government would give utility companies the power to expand the use of power stations in the coal.

This would ensure that Germany has an alternative energy source, but would further set back the country’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions.

“It’s bittersweet,” Mr. Habeck said of the need to rely on coal. “But in this situation, you have to reduce gas consumption. Gas tanks should be full before winter. This has the highest priority.

Legislation regarding the use of coal is expected to be approved on July 8 in the Bundesrat, the upper house of parliament, Habeck said. The measure expires on March 31, 2024, by which time the government hopes to have created a sustainable alternative to Russian gas.

Mr Habeck also said the government would introduce an auction system which would incentivize industry to reduce consumption.

The government has not released any details on how the auction will work, but Mr Habeck said it would start this summer.

Rising oil prices helped push the national average price of a gallon of gasoline to $5 for the first time, leading to increased inflationary pressure in the US economy. Photo illustration: Todd Johnson

Mr Habeck said the new measures are aimed at diverting dwindling gas supplies from Russia to storage reservoirs for use during the winter. Germany aims to have its gas storage facilities 90% full by December. Currently, gas storage facilities in Germany are around 56% full, Habeck said.

These measures are in addition to a variety of previously announced measures aimed at reducing Germany’s dependence on Russian gas. According to plans drafted earlier, the government could ration gas for industrial users if it ran out in winter.

The government has made arrangements to buy gas from non-Russian sources and is accelerating construction of a liquefied natural gas terminal in the North Sea near Wilhelmshaven.

Mr Habeck said two of the four special vessels planned to convert liquefied natural gas that can be injected into the German grid would become operational this winter, allowing the country to resupply itself with gas independently from Russia.

Write to William Boston at william.boston@wsj.com

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

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In an energy-strapped Europe, coal gets a reprieve in Greece https://egs-schuetzen.com/in-an-energy-strapped-europe-coal-gets-a-reprieve-in-greece/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 14:38:27 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/in-an-energy-strapped-europe-coal-gets-a-reprieve-in-greece/ A coal shovel sits in Greece’s largest mine outside the northern town of Kozani. Turbulence in the energy market caused by the war in Ukraine has triggered an increase in coal-fired electricity generation in the European Union and a temporary slowdown in the closure of power plants long intended for retirement. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis) KOZANI, […]]]>

A coal shovel sits in Greece’s largest mine outside the northern town of Kozani. Turbulence in the energy market caused by the war in Ukraine has triggered an increase in coal-fired electricity generation in the European Union and a temporary slowdown in the closure of power plants long intended for retirement. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

KOZANI, Greece (AP) — At Greece’s largest coal mine, controlled explosions and the roar of giant excavators scooping up blasted rock are once again commonplace. Coal production has been ramped up at the site near the town of Kozani in northern Greece as war in Ukraine has forced many European countries to rethink their energy supply.

Coal, long considered a legacy fuel in Europe, is now helping the continent preserve its electricity supply and cope with soaring natural gas prices caused by the war.

Electricity generated by coal in the European Union jumped 19% in the fourth quarter of 2021 compared to the previous year, according to the EU’s energy directorate, faster than any other energy source , as tension rose between Russia and Ukraine and before the invasion in late February.

Russian gas accounted for more than 40% of total gas consumption in the EU last year, leaving the bloc to search for alternatives as prices rose and supply was cut to several countries. Russia also supplied 27% of the EU’s oil imports and 46% of its coal imports.

The crisis has caught Greece at a difficult time in its own transition.

For decades, the country has relied on domestic mining of lignite, a low-grade, high-emitting type of coal, but recently accelerated plans to shut down older power plants, promising to make renewables Greece’s main source of energy by 2030. Currently, renewables make up about a third of the country’s energy mix.

A recently completed solar park, one of the largest in Europe, is just half an hour’s drive from the country’s largest open-pit lignite mine, near the northern town of Kozani.

At the inauguration of the new solar facility, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis announced a 50% increase in lignite production until 2024 to build up reserves. Plans to retire more coal-fired power plants have been put on hold.

“Not only Greece, but all European countries are making minor changes to their energy transition programs with short-term – and I emphasize short-term – measures,” Mitsotakis said at the April 6 event. . Greek officials say the country is naturally suited to the development of solar and wind energy. It is testing EU-sponsored battery technology to try to wean its islands off expensive and polluting diesel-powered local power stations.

The Kozani mine covers an area nearly nine times the size of New York’s JFK airport: a black basin sunk into land surrounded by forests and poppy fields. Excavators use claw wheels higher than the side of a house to load coal into long conveyor belt lanes.

“It was the heart of Greece’s energy production,” mine manager Antonis Nikou said, speaking outside the plant and standing near the Orthodox Christian Church of Saint Barbara, the traditional protector miners, firefighters and others facing danger at work.

Nikou sees the end of the coal era in Greece as inevitable, a conviction shared for the rest of the EU by his own policymakers and many experts who argue that the brief comeback of coal will only serve as a safety net for that countries are stepping up renewable energy and updating their power grids.

“Trying to feel safe in terms of not being cold next winter is understandable, but it’s a very short-term arrangement,” said Elif Gunduzyeli, senior energy policy coordinator. at the Climate Action Network Europe, a coalition of environmental campaigns based in Brussels. groups.

The money needed to modernize the coal industry and find new deposits, she says, no longer attracts investors.

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In energy-strapped Europe, coal gets a recall https://egs-schuetzen.com/in-energy-strapped-europe-coal-gets-a-recall/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:07:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/in-energy-strapped-europe-coal-gets-a-recall/ Placeholder while loading article actions KOZANI, Greece – At Greece’s largest coal mine, controlled explosions and the roar of giant excavators scooping up blasted rock are once again commonplace. Coal production was ramped up at the site near the town of Kozani in northern Greece as war in Ukraine forced many European countries to rethink […]]]>
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KOZANI, Greece – At Greece’s largest coal mine, controlled explosions and the roar of giant excavators scooping up blasted rock are once again commonplace. Coal production was ramped up at the site near the town of Kozani in northern Greece as war in Ukraine forced many European countries to rethink their energy supply.

Coal, long considered a legacy fuel in Europe, is now helping the continent preserve its electricity supply and cope with soaring natural gas prices caused by the war.

Electricity generated by coal in the European Union jumped 19% in the fourth quarter of 2021 compared to the previous year, according to the EU’s energy directorate, faster than any other energy source , as tension rose between Russia and Ukraine and before the invasion in late February.

Russian gas accounted for more than 40% of total gas consumption in the EU last year, leaving the bloc searching for alternatives as prices rose and supply was cut to several countries. Russia also supplied 27% of the EU’s oil imports and 46% of its coal imports.

The crisis has caught Greece at a difficult time in its own transition.

For decades, the country has relied on domestic mining of lignite, a low-grade, high-emitting type of coal, but recently accelerated plans to shut down older power plants, promising to make renewables Greece’s main source of energy by 2030. Currently, renewables make up about a third of the country’s energy mix.

A recently completed solar park, one of the largest in Europe, is just half an hour’s drive from the country’s largest open-pit lignite mine, near the northern town of Kozani.

At the inauguration of the new solar facility, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis announced a 50% increase in lignite production until 2024 to build up reserves. Plans to retire more coal-fired power plants have been put on hold.

“Not only Greece, but all European countries are making minor changes to their energy transition programs with short-term – and I emphasize short-term – measures,” Mitsotakis said at the April 6 event. .

Greek officials say the country is naturally suited to the development of solar and wind energy. It is testing EU-sponsored battery technology to try to wean its islands off expensive and polluting diesel-powered local power stations.

The Kozani mine covers an area nearly nine times the size of New York’s JFK airport: a black basin sunk into land surrounded by forests and poppy fields. Excavators use claw wheels higher than the side of a house to load coal into long conveyor belt lanes.

“It was the heart of Greece’s energy production,” mine manager Antonis Nikou said, speaking outside the plant and standing near the Orthodox Christian Church of Saint Barbara, the traditional protector miners, firefighters and others facing danger at work.

Nikou sees the end of the coal era in Greece as inevitable, a conviction shared for the rest of the EU by his own policymakers and many experts who argue that coal’s brief comeback will only serve as a safety net for that countries are stepping up renewable energy and updating their power grids.

“Trying to feel safe in terms of not being cold next winter is understandable, but it’s a very short-term arrangement,” said Elif Gunduzyeli, senior energy policy coordinator. at the Climate Action Network Europe, a coalition of environmental campaigns based in Brussels. groups.

The money needed to modernize the coal industry and find new deposits, she says, no longer attracts investors.

The integration of post-war Western Europe was largely driven by coal ‒ the European Coal and Steel Community formed in 1951 eventually evolved into the European Union ‒ but coal consumption the EU has long been overshadowed by other nations. China uses more coal than the rest of the world combined.

EU coal consumption has fallen by more than 60% over the past 30 years, with the decline accelerating since 2018.

Regulation in Europe and how it achieves international climate goals is closely watched by other industrial powers, as well as how it manages to save local economies in endangered mining communities.

Officially named the West Macedonia Lignite Center, the Kozani mine now employs 1,500 workers, down from 6,000 in the 1990s. The nearby 400-hectare (1,000-acre) solar park only hires 20.

The Greek Electricity Workers’ Union is lobbying the government to give coal a longer lifespan, instead of using gas imports which are now more expensive.

“It is clear that this transition has not taken place on a level playing field but in a way that has supported the interests of natural gas,” labor leader George Adamidis told the AP in an interview. “We made the decision to move away from Russian natural gas, but importing liquefied natural gas from the United States and elsewhere also involves a process that pollutes and therefore does not serve our climate goals.”

The union wants to extend the life of modern coal-fired power plants by around five years, until 2035, and even increase its share of electricity production from less than 15% currently to around 25%.

The government says money from the European Union’s Just Transition Fund, set up to help coal mining communities and other transition victims, will be used to help areas like Kozani with multiple programs, including including restoration of mined lands.

But Pavlos Deligiannis, a retired mine worker, urged authorities to extend the transition and give alternative industries tax breaks and other financial incentives to invest in the region and create jobs.

“We all know charcoal has an expiration date,” he said. “Our young people are leaving town… If you want a smooth transition, you think about the next business before closing the existing one. This is not what happened here, we did the opposite and we are not prepared for the green transition.

Follow Gatopoulos at https://twitter.com/dgatopoulos

Costas Kantouris in Thessaloniki, Greece contributed.

The Associated Press’s climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. Learn more about AP’s climate initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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Your Tuesday briefing: Europe recalculates on Ukraine https://egs-schuetzen.com/your-tuesday-briefing-europe-recalculates-on-ukraine/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:53:59 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/your-tuesday-briefing-europe-recalculates-on-ukraine/ Hello. We cover Europe’s recalculation on Ukraine, the revelations from the January 6 hearings and a truckers’ strike in South Korea. Europe recalculates as Russia wins As Russia advances east, European leaders are under increasing pressure to forge a cohesive strategy to define what could constitute Ukrainian victory – or Russian defeat. European leaders say […]]]>

Hello. We cover Europe’s recalculation on Ukraine, the revelations from the January 6 hearings and a truckers’ strike in South Korea.

As Russia advances east, European leaders are under increasing pressure to forge a cohesive strategy to define what could constitute Ukrainian victory – or Russian defeat.

European leaders say it is up to Ukraine to decide how and when to start negotiations to end the war. They all provided significant financial and military support to Ukraine, which continued to press for more weapons.

But some European allies are increasingly nervous about a long war. They don’t want to put NATO in direct conflict with Russia – and they don’t want to goad President Vladimir Putin into using nuclear or chemical weapons. Here are the recent updates.

And after: Yesterday it became known that the leaders of France, Germany and Italy are planning to visit Kyiv, possibly as early as this week.

The House committee investigating the January 6 attack on the United States Capitol continued hearings yesterday. One after another, members of Donald Trump’s inner circle testified that they told the former president that his allegations of widespread voter fraud were false. But Trump pushed the lie anyway.

William Barr, the former attorney general, said in recorded deposition that Trump became delusional. Barr said in the weeks following the 2020 election, he repeatedly told Trump “how crazy some of those allegations were.”

“He’s detached from reality if he really believes in it,” Barr said, speaking of Trump. “There was never any indication of interest in what the actual facts were.”

Resources: Here are four takeaways from yesterday’s hearings and five takeaways from the first day of last week’s hearings. The next hearing is scheduled for tomorrow at 10 a.m. Eastern Time (i.e. 10 p.m. in Hong Kong).

Analysis: The committee is trying to argue that Trump knew his allegations of fraudulent elections were not true. Barr’s testimony suggests another explanation: Trump has come to believe his own lies.

Finance: The committee said Trump used lies about the fraud to raise hundreds of millions of dollars. The big lie was also a “big scam”, said a member of the committee.


Yesterday, a truckers’ strike in South Korea dragged on into a seventh day, forcing the country’s manufacturers to cut production and slow traffic at its ports.

The union representing truckers said it has repeatedly called for safer conditions and reasonable rates. Truckers are protesting soaring fuel prices and demanding minimum wage guarantees, Reuters reported. A trucker told Reuters he was earning around $2,300 a month and his monthly fuel bill had risen by around $1,000 since April.

This strike is proving costly for the South Korean economy and causing widespread domestic delays: in the first six days, it led to disruptions in the production and shipments of automobiles, steel and petrochemicals from worth 1.6 trillion won (about $1.25 billion), the government said.

Overall context: The strike could further disrupt the struggling global supply chain. But so far, the Associated Press reported, the country has reported no major disruptions to major exports.

And after: Yesterday truckers said they could worsen the disruption if demands are not met, Reuters reported, including halting shipments of coal to a power station.

  • Beijing is racing to control a coronavirus outbreak linked to a 24-hour bar, Reuters reported.

  • Chinese police have arrested nine people suspected of assault after footage of an attack on women in a restaurant went viral, the Associated Press reported.

India’s economy is growing rapidly: exports are at record highs and profits of listed companies have doubled. But India cannot produce enough jobs, a sign of its uneven growth and widening inequality.

Documenta, arguably the largest contemporary art exhibition in the world, opens later this month in Kassel, Germany. It will last 100 days and will welcome nearly a million visitors.

Ruangrupa, a radical Indonesian creative collective, is leading the 15th edition of Documenta. The group has long rejected the idea of ​​art as an object and instead turns social experiences into art.

For their only solo gallery exhibition, ruangrupa threw a party and left the trash as an exhibit. Some artists were skeptical of the art. “We told them, ‘You felt energized and inspired. You have met your friends. It’s the art,” said one member.

At Documenta, they will work with 14 other collectives and their colleagues to experiment with the idea of ​​the lumbung, the communal rice granary traditionally found in Indonesian villages, built and shared by all.

“It’s not just that they don’t create tangible objects, they don’t even create intangible experiences,” writes Samanth Subramanian in The Times Magazine, adding, “Instead of collaborating to make art , ruangrupa spreads the art of collaboration. It is a collective that teaches community.

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Switzerland adopts new EU sanctions against Russia and Belarus – JURIST https://egs-schuetzen.com/switzerland-adopts-new-eu-sanctions-against-russia-and-belarus-jurist/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:22:52 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/switzerland-adopts-new-eu-sanctions-against-russia-and-belarus-jurist/ The Swiss Federal Council on Friday adopted new European Union (EU) sanctions against Russia and Belarus. Although Switzerland is not a member of the EU, it has several bilateral treaties with the bloc. The sixth EU sanctions package includes an oil embargo, prompting the Federal Council to commission a study on the economic consequences of […]]]>

The Swiss Federal Council on Friday adopted new European Union (EU) sanctions against Russia and Belarus. Although Switzerland is not a member of the EU, it has several bilateral treaties with the bloc. The sixth EU sanctions package includes an oil embargo, prompting the Federal Council to commission a study on the economic consequences of the imposition of the oil embargo.

The sanctions against individuals and entities mirror existing EU sanctions targeting military personnel accused of atrocities in Bucha and Mariupol. Among them are also several people with close financial ties to the Kremlin. A notable addition is Aleksandra Melnichenko, who was sanctioned shortly after her husband, Russian billionaire Andrey Melnichenko, transferred his business assets to her. In a bombshell investigation, Reuters found that Andrey transferred Eurochem and SUEK, two of the world’s largest coal and fertilizer companies, into his wife’s name a day before his sanction, in an effort to protect his assets.

The new penalties also include Sberbank, one of the largest Russian banks, thereby preventing Sberbank from accessing the SWIFT transaction system in Switzerland. SWIFT is a global financial messaging service that enables banks to communicate during financial transactions across the world. It is one of the most commonly used services. SWIFT has announced its intention to comply with the sanctions.

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Trelleborg supplies Australian ship loader, berth replacement project https://egs-schuetzen.com/trelleborg-supplies-australian-ship-loader-berth-replacement-project/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 07:18:11 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/trelleborg-supplies-australian-ship-loader-berth-replacement-project/ Passive grout joints and grout seals prevent leaks to protect the biodiversity of the Great Barrier Reef Queensland, Australia – Trelleborg Marine and Infrastructure is participating in a Ship Loader and Berth Replacement (SABR) project which aims to improve operational safety and efficiency at Hay Point Coal Terminal, Mackay, Australia. queensland. The Swedish engineering group […]]]>
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Winter is coming: Ukraine will stop selling coal and gas abroad https://egs-schuetzen.com/winter-is-coming-ukraine-will-stop-selling-coal-and-gas-abroad/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 16:34:24 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/winter-is-coming-ukraine-will-stop-selling-coal-and-gas-abroad/ Ukrainian Zelenskyy prepares to limit energy exports to prepare for winter – In his Tuesday evening address, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy announced plans keep energy prices as low as possible for Ukrainian citizens. Ukraine’s president said he was now taking steps to “prepare for the next heating season”, which he said would be the most […]]]>

Ukrainian Zelenskyy prepares to limit energy exports to prepare for winter – In his Tuesday evening address, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy announced plans keep energy prices as low as possible for Ukrainian citizens. Ukraine’s president said he was now taking steps to “prepare for the next heating season”, which he said would be the most difficult since the country’s independence.

“Whatever the occupiers plan for themselves, we must prepare for the coming winter – in our state, on our lands, for all citizens,” Zelenskyy said.

“Issues of purchasing enough gas for the heating season, coal accumulation and power generation were discussed today,” he continued, adding that if the next heating season will be the toughest since gaining independence, “everything is fine.”

“We have to go through this so that our people feel the normal work of the state,” he said.

Zelenskyy explained that his government will no longer sell coal and gas abroad and that all domestic production will be refocused to ensure Ukrainian citizens have access to the fuel they need this winter.

At the same time, however, he said the country will also do its utmost to increase power export capacities, with a view to generating revenue from the sale of energy to neighboring countries. Zelenskyy also said the plan would help reduce European dependence on Russian energy.

Zelenskyy also announced a thermal power plant repair program currently underway, with assistance made available to boiler rooms and power plants that have been damaged or destroyed by Russian strikes in the past three months.

“I want to emphasize that I have set a very specific task for the government to do everything possible to ensure that gas and electricity tariffs do not change in the next heating season,” he said. declared.

How much energy does Ukraine sell?

In 2015, Ukraine produced 670,985 cubic feet of natural gas per year and ranked 36e in the world for gas production, which makes the impact of blocking Ukrainian gas exports minimal on the world market. Ukraine also imported around 43% of its gas in the same year, with the country maintaining similar levels of dependence on foreign gas in recent years.

Coal will be an important fuel for Ukraine this winter. More than 90% of the country’s fossil fuel reserves are coal, with 38 billion short tons of coal reserves in Ukraine in 2019, ranking sixth in the world behind the United States, China, India, Australia and Russia. Coal production was steadily declining before the Russian invasion, although production is likely to increase in the coming months when possible.

With Russian forces controlling 20% ​​of Ukraine, including most of its industrial regions, increasing production is likely to be difficult.

Jack Buckby is a British author, counter-extremism researcher and journalist based in New York. Reporting from the UK, Europe and the US, it strives to analyze and understand left and right radicalisation, and reports on Western government approaches to pressing issues of today. His books and research papers explore these themes and offer pragmatic solutions to our increasingly polarized society.

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France in talks with UAE to replace Russian oil supply after latest EU sanctions: report https://egs-schuetzen.com/france-in-talks-with-uae-to-replace-russian-oil-supply-after-latest-eu-sanctions-report/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 13:01:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/france-in-talks-with-uae-to-replace-russian-oil-supply-after-latest-eu-sanctions-report/ As the war in Eastern Europe continues to escalate unabated, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said the country was in talks with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to replace the supply of Russian oil. “Discussions are ongoing with the UAE as we need to find a substitute for Russian oil,” he said. Radio Europe […]]]>

As the war in Eastern Europe continues to escalate unabated, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said the country was in talks with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to replace the supply of Russian oil. “Discussions are ongoing with the UAE as we need to find a substitute for Russian oil,” he said. Radio Europe 1. His remarks came days after the European Union (EU) agreed on the sixth sanctions package that is expected to cut Russia’s oil imports to the bloc’s 27 members by around two-thirds.

Le Maire further said that France also intends to boost investment in greener energy transitions, such as offshore wind farms, to reduce the country’s energy dependence on other countries. Meanwhile, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov claimed that the EU’s partial embargo on Russian oil will have a “negative impact” on the entire world market. He further pointed out that the European market is crucial for Russia in terms of supply, as well as sales volumes. According to him, Russia is also considering the possibility of redirecting unused oil volumes to other destinations.

Russia says it will find other importers of its oil after latest EU embargo

The Kremlin spokesperson further stressed that the impact of the oil embargo on Russia will be mitigated by systematic measures and that Europe will face “serious consequences” due to its own decisions. Meanwhile, Russia has also retaliated against the latest round of EU sanctions on oil imports. Reacting to the sixth round of EU sanctions, Mikhail Ulyanov, Russia’s permanent representative to international organizations in Vienna, said Moscow would find other importers of its oil.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen also claimed the 27-member bloc had agreed to gradually reduce its dependence on Russian gas, oil and coal as soon as possible.

Russia says it continues to take steps to fight sanctions against it

It is important to mention here that several countries around the world have imposed numerous sanctions against Russia since it launched a full-fledged war against Ukraine at the end of February. Meanwhile, the Russian government has said it continues to take steps to stabilize the economy and fight sanctions imposed by Western countries.

Addressing a virtual meeting of the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council (EEC) on May 27, Russian President Vladimir Putin said his government was acting decisively to ensure the smooth functioning of the market and the financial sector.

(Picture: AP)

Follow all the news and headlines from the Russian-Ukrainian war on Live updates from the Russia-Ukraine war

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EU exceeds 2020 climate target and records 34% drop in emissions – EURACTIV.com https://egs-schuetzen.com/eu-exceeds-2020-climate-target-and-records-34-drop-in-emissions-euractiv-com/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 13:10:11 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/eu-exceeds-2020-climate-target-and-records-34-drop-in-emissions-euractiv-com/ The European Union has cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 34% below 1990 levels by 2020, surpassing the bloc’s 20% target, according to official data submitted Wednesday (31 May) to the UNFCCC. The European Environment Agency (EEA) on Wednesday submitted official EU data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The 961-page […]]]>

The European Union has cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 34% below 1990 levels by 2020, surpassing the bloc’s 20% target, according to official data submitted Wednesday (31 May) to the UNFCCC.

The European Environment Agency (EEA) on Wednesday submitted official EU data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The 961-page stocktaking report confirmed preliminary data suggesting the European Union was on track to meet its 2020 climate target.

The EU had already cut emissions by 26% in 2019 and hit its 20% target before COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns began to impact emission levels, the EEA said. .

Emissions fell 11% in 2020 alone as EU countries shut down their economies to contain the coronavirus outbreak, the EEA said, admitting COVID-19 lockdowns “have had an impact substantial reduction in emissions in 2020”.

Still, “the data confirms a 30-year downward trend that has led the EU to meet its 2020 target of reducing emissions by 20% below 1990 levels,” it said in a statement.

Over the past 30 years, EU emissions reductions have been driven primarily by the increasing use of renewable energy and the substitution of coal for gas in electricity generation.

The report showed that coal use has seen an unprecedented decline and was three times lower in 2020 than in 1990.

The EEA said lower heating demand due to warmer winters in Europe also played a role.

But although manufacturing industries saw an overall drop in emissions, there were notable exceptions with transport, refrigeration and air conditioning, whose emissions rose by 53 and 80 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent respectively, according to The report.

While almost all EU countries have succeeded in reducing their emissions, the decline is mainly due to the United Kingdom and Germany, which have accounted for 47% of total net reductions over the past 30 years, said notice the AEE.

As the UK leaves the EU in 2020 and emissions rise again after the coronavirus pandemic, the numbers may not look so rosy in future reports.

Emissions jumped 18% in the spring of last year as the economy recovered from pandemic shutdowns, according to EU data released last year. And Europe’s exit from coal was brought to a halt in 2021 due to rising gas prices, which discouraged the switch from coal to gas.

“The 11% decline in 2019-20 is good news from a climate perspective, but likely primarily caused by COVID and the associated drop in overall economic activity,” said Wijnand Stoefs of Carbon Market Watch, a group non-profit.

“We expect the 2021 and 2022 numbers to rebound – for example, EU ETS emissions have already increased by 7.3% in 2021,” Stoefs pointed out, referring to the EU’s carbon market. EU, the emissions trading system.

“As the EEA has made clear, there is a serious risk of a rebound in emissions,” added Camille Maury of WWF’s European Policy Office. And the EU’s ongoing carbon market reform “is not on track to achieve our climate neutrality goals”, she said in comments emailed to EURACTIV.

Overall, environmental groups were unimpressed with the EU’s record, saying the bar for 2020 was far too low.

“The 2020 targets were simply not ambitious enough, so they were achieved without real effort,” Stoefs said. “The lesson here is that we need more ambitious targets, including for 2030.”

“Achieving too low a climate target due to a temporary economic downturn is nothing to cheer about. Aiming or hitting targets lower than what science says is the EU’s share of keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees is an abdication of responsibility,” said Greenpeace climate activist Silvia Pastorelli. EU.

Under EU climate law approved last year, the European Union is aiming for a 55% net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 before reaching net zero by 2050.

[Edited by Alice Taylor]

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Hungary continues to hold back EU efforts to phase out Russian oil https://egs-schuetzen.com/hungary-continues-to-hold-back-eu-efforts-to-phase-out-russian-oil/ Mon, 30 May 2022 13:33:35 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/hungary-continues-to-hold-back-eu-efforts-to-phase-out-russian-oil/ Placeholder while loading article actions BRUSSELS — The European Union has not finished talking about Russian oil. He’s not done buying it either. During talks on Monday morning, EU ambassadors again failed to reach an agreement to phase out oil imports from Russia due to continued opposition from Hungary, keeping the issue on the EU […]]]>
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BRUSSELS — The European Union has not finished talking about Russian oil. He’s not done buying it either.

During talks on Monday morning, EU ambassadors again failed to reach an agreement to phase out oil imports from Russia due to continued opposition from Hungary, keeping the issue on the EU agenda – and Russian oil flowing to Europe – for at least another day. .

The issue now threatens to eclipse a two-day European Council summit on the war in Ukraine starting Monday afternoon in Brussels, where European leaders will discuss a watered-down plan that would ban deliveries by sea but exempt oil by pipeline.

A senior EU official, speaking on condition of anonymity to brief the press, said the European Council hopes to reach a political agreement on the revised proposal on Monday. It is not yet clear whether the 27 leaders will sign.

Arriving at the summit, Orban said he had seen the revised proposal and there was still no agreement on it. He welcomed the decision to exempt oil from the pipeline – a Hungarian request to begin with – but said he still needed guarantees that his country’s Russian oil supply would be protected if anything. arrived at the pipeline that crosses Ukraine to Hungary.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said on Monday there would eventually be a deal. “I don’t expect this to be resolved in the next 48 hours,” she told reporters upon arriving at the summit in Brussels.

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On Monday, EU leaders will listen to a virtual address by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and discuss support for his country. But they won’t be able to escape the fact that Europe continues to buy large amounts of Russian oil, which keeps money flowing to the Kremlin.

Ever since Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, member states have been trying to find ways to wean off Russian fossil fuels while still getting enough power to keep the lights on across Europe. They agreed to phase out coal, but oil negotiations have been more difficult and have now been stalled for weeks by Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban.

Orban likened an EU oil ban to dropping a “nuclear bomb” on his country’s economy and urged more time and money to upgrade his landlocked country’s oil infrastructure. Although there was a push to give concessions to Hungary and other countries that are heavily dependent on the Russian pipeline, the Hungarian leader won extensions but continues to push for more, according to EU officials and diplomats.

Some are expressing concern that Orban – one of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s closest allies in Europe – appears to be using the situation to hit back at EU officials for withholding economic stimulus money from the EU. Hungary and threatened to withhold billions in democratic backsliding grants.

EU proposes to cut funds to Hungary for violation of rule of law

The latest proposal on the table calls for a ban on deliveries by sea within months, but exempts pipeline deliveries for now, which keeps oil flowing from Russia to several EU countries, including the Hungary, according to a draft proposal obtained by The Washington Post. The draft does not set a timetable for phasing out or exemption.

Exempting pipeline oil would mitigate the impact of oil measures. An EU official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to brief the press, said phasing out all sea deliveries would affect two-thirds of imports.

The pipeline oil exemption allows continued supplies via the Druzhba network, which crosses Belarus to Poland and Germany, and via Ukraine to Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary. Given that Poland and Germany have already pledged to wean off Russian oil this year, the bloc could theoretically cut even further.

However, there is no doubt that the compromise – and the message it sends – is a boon for Russia, many of whom in Brussels are wondering what went wrong.

Many EU officials and diplomats have tried to downplay Hungary’s role, portraying the challenges as technical, not political.

A senior EU diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive issues, said that, in an effort to act quickly, EU officials and diplomats had not considered any pretty close to what an oil would mean for member states that get most or all of their oil from Russia.

“Under the pressure of this war, we took action too soon and we are now suffering the consequences,” the senior diplomat said.

Others see the issue as inherently political – and all about Orban. “Every time something is conceded to Hungary, they ask for something more,” said another EU diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss the ongoing negotiations.

“Let’s see what happens with Orban tonight,” the diplomat continued. “He’s the one taking the reins.”

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