European Community – EGS Schuetzen http://egs-schuetzen.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:51:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://egs-schuetzen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png European Community – EGS Schuetzen http://egs-schuetzen.com/ 32 32 What would EU candidate status mean for Ukraine? https://egs-schuetzen.com/what-would-eu-candidate-status-mean-for-ukraine/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:51:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/what-would-eu-candidate-status-mean-for-ukraine/ Ukraine’s aspirations for European integration will be on the agenda of the next European Council in Brussels on 23 and 24 June. European leaders are expected to formally grant Ukraine EU candidate nation status at the summit, marking what would be another milestone in the country’s long journey towards closer ties with the 27-nation bloc. […]]]>

Ukraine’s aspirations for European integration will be on the agenda of the next European Council in Brussels on 23 and 24 June. European leaders are expected to formally grant Ukraine EU candidate nation status at the summit, marking what would be another milestone in the country’s long journey towards closer ties with the 27-nation bloc.

Recognition of Ukraine as a candidate country would not guarantee future EU membership. In effect, Ukraine would become one of many countries with the same candidate status. Nonetheless, it would represent a significant breakthrough for Kyiv at a time when Ukrainians are defending their country against Russian invasion in a conflict driven in large part by Kremlin opposition to Ukraine’s European ambitions.

The war launched by Vladimir Putin on February 24 marks a major escalation in an eight-year campaign of Russian military aggression against Ukraine. One of the main factors behind the conflict is the Russian dictator’s concern over Ukrainian attempts to turn away from Moscow and integrate into the Euro-Atlantic community of nations.

Putin believes the emergence of a European Ukraine would spark similar demands for change within Russia itself and serve as a catalyst for the next stage of Russia’s slow but steady imperial decline. As the current invasion shows, he is ready to do anything to prevent the loss of Ukraine.

Ukrainians overwhelmingly support EU integration and expect good news from this week’s summit. At the same time, there are no illusions about the likelihood of a fast track to membership. The Atlantic Council asked a range of experts what they thought EU candidate status would mean for Ukraine.

Myriam Kosmehl, Senior Expert Eastern Europe, Bertelsmann Stiftung, Germany: Ukrainians would rightly be encouraged by EU candidate status. This step is necessary to revitalize reform efforts and impact political decision-making within the Ukrainian government.

Ukraine’s progress in integrating into the EU under the Association Agreement since 2014 gives it an excellent start as all aspects of the enlargement process are included in Ukraine’s existing commitments under the association agreement.

At the same time, significant challenges related to the rule of law and corruption remain. The five bodies of the anti-corruption ecosystem set up after the 2014 Dignity Revolution in Ukraine have demonstrated their ability to effectively target corruption, but they themselves have been targeted by older structures in the justice system, prosecutors and security services.

Ukrainian society is currently mobilizing enormous resources to resist Russian aggression. Hopefully EU candidate nation status would help civil society shape the political agenda, just as it did in 2014. Anti-corruption institutions remain institutionally intact despite the war but have been forced to reduce their activities. They must continue to work and receive the full support of the authorities.

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Vitaly Sych, Chief Editor, NV press house: There are a number of reasons why official EU recognition of Ukraine’s European aspirations is extremely important at this time. The first reason is emotional. Ukrainians need encouraging news and a glimpse of hope in these painful times. EU candidate status would certainly qualify.

Second, it is a great chance to modernize the country. Joining the EU comes with a long list of conditions that will require Kyiv to make major progress in different areas, from judicial reform to individual freedoms and trade regulations. The government will come under enormous pressure from the Ukrainian media, civil society and Western partners to carry out these reforms. This can help Ukraine make rapid progress, just as the push for visa-free travel to the EU a few years ago led to dozens of reforms that might not have been implemented. implemented otherwise.

Candidate status would also bring financial benefits. This would send a strong signal to the world that Ukraine is an attractive investment opportunity with the potential for strong future growth.

Ultimately, gaining EU candidate status would represent an important step in Ukraine’s efforts to finally say goodbye to Soviet heritage and join the family of European nations. In the end, that is what the current war is all about.

Olena Halushka, Co-founder, International Center for Ukrainian Victory: Granting EU candidate status to Ukraine would be a powerful symbolic step that would also have tangible practical implications for the country.

Above all, candidate status would represent a well-deserved recognition of Ukraine’s reform progress since 2014. It would send a signal of support and boost the morale of Ukraine’s frontline defenders and those currently living in parts of the countries occupied by Russia. It would also send a strong message to Russian President Vladimir Putin that Ukraine is part of the EU family and will one day become a full member of the European Union.

Candidate status will bring with it a roadmap of reform that will serve as a powerful lever for civil society to maintain the momentum of Ukraine’s reform agenda. The list that has been proposed by the European Commission includes some important measures that are already priorities of my organisation, the Anti-Corruption Action Centre. This includes the reform of the High Council of Justice and the High Qualification Commission of Judges as well as the Constitutional Court of Ukraine.

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Taras Kuzio, Researcher, Henry Jackson Society: By granting Ukraine EU candidate status, the EU can repel Russian aggression and the Kremlin’s longstanding opposition to Ukraine’s European integration. Russia began to oppose EU enlargement after the launch of the Eastern Partnership initiative in 2009. From then on, Russia began to view the EU in the same hostile way as she had traditionally considered NATO.

Basically, candidate status would take Ukraine out of the geopolitical gray zone between Eurasia and Europe. This would put Ukraine firmly on a European path away from Moscow and the proposed Eurasian Economic Union that Putin had sought to build around a core of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine.

Candidate status would both reflect the progress of reforms in Ukraine since 2014 and deserved recognition of Ukraine’s determination to defend its sovereignty and its European aspirations. Ukrainians first paid in blood for their European choice during the country’s Euromaidan revolution and are now doing so against Russian forces in what is the biggest European conflict since World War II.

Andy Hunder, President, American Chamber of Commerce in Ukraine: The message behind EU candidate status is clear: Ukraine is coming home. Ukraine is returning to the European family of nations whose values ​​it shares and is moving away from the yoke of Russia’s vicious grip.

EU candidate status will launch a new trajectory of GDP growth while massively boosting morale for post-war economic transformation and reform implementation. Such a decision sends a positive message to investors that Ukraine is moving in the right direction. There is no future for clean businesses in Russia. Instead, companies will see Ukraine as a prime destination for post-war investment.

If Ukraine obtains the status of an EU candidate nation, the country will undoubtedly make maximum efforts to carry out all the necessary reforms as soon as possible, such as the implementation of a reform real and effective judiciary, the rule of law, fair justice and the establishment of a level playing field. for the business community. We will see a comprehensive approach to creating a robust state and a competitive economy.

Oleksi Goncharenko, Ukrainian MP, European Solidarity Party: For Ukraine, the decision to grant EU candidate status would be much more than a mere technical formality. This would demonstrate that Europe is on Ukraine’s side and refuses to submit to Russian blackmail. This would represent the ultimate answer to the simple question of whether Ukraine has a future beyond the current devastating war.

Candidate status would also give an important new impetus to reforms in the country. This potential for driving reform is evident from the successful experience of other European countries that have already gone through the application phase for possible EU membership. Meanwhile, Ukraine could expect positive economic consequences from candidate status due to the gradual impact of reforms and increased investor confidence in the country’s future.

Peter Dickinson is editor of the Atlantic Council’s UkraineAlert service.

Further reading

The opinions expressed in UkraineAlert are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Atlantic Council, its staff or its supporters.

The Eurasia Center mission is to strengthen transatlantic cooperation in promoting stability, democratic values ​​and prosperity in Eurasia, from Eastern Europe and Turkey in the West to the Caucasus, Russia and the Central Asia to the East.

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Image: A rally in support of Ukraine’s EU candidate status. (Photo by Ying Tang/NurPhoto)

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The role of the European Union in supporting international peace and security https://egs-schuetzen.com/the-role-of-the-european-union-in-supporting-international-peace-and-security/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:23:38 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/the-role-of-the-european-union-in-supporting-international-peace-and-security/ Thank you, Mr President, and I join others in thanking the High Representative for his briefing and wishing him a speedy recovery and a return to face-to-face meetings. As many colleagues have said, this year has been one of the most difficult years for Europe since the Second World War, with Russia’s illegal and unprovoked […]]]>

Thank you, Mr President, and I join others in thanking the High Representative for his briefing and wishing him a speedy recovery and a return to face-to-face meetings.

As many colleagues have said, this year has been one of the most difficult years for Europe since the Second World War, with Russia’s illegal and unprovoked invasion of Ukraine causing death and devastation, and forcing millions of refugees into neighboring states.

This has been a difficult year for the international community, with the actions of Russia and other conflicts exacerbating existing problems in a world ravaged by the Covid-19 pandemic and climate change.

And it has been a difficult year for the UN, the multilateral system and the rules-based international norms that we value.

We therefore welcome the positive role played by the EU and other regional organizations in promoting diplomacy and multilateralism, and in supporting the Security Council for international peace and security.

First, we salute the incredible support for Ukrainians and the help provided to Ukraine to defend itself. The UK supports an outward looking EU and appreciates our cooperation in addressing this latest breach of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. This includes coordinating measures to limit Russia’s ability to finance and wage its war; and on the Atrocity Crimes Advisory Group to support the Ukrainian Prosecutor General.

We also work together on food safety issues. I would particularly like to welcome the words of the High Representative refuting the disinformation on the sanctions.

Secondly, we welcome the important contribution of the EU to the work of the Council. This includes EU efforts to restore the JCPoA; its renewed partnership with the African Union; and its contribution to UN peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations, including, for example, its contribution on Somalia.

In Europe, we strongly support EU efforts in the Western Balkans, where we coordinate to support the European orientation of the region; ensuring progress in the EU-facilitated Serbia-Kosovo dialogue; and working on the renewal of EUFOR Althea’s mandate in November.

Finally, we welcome the work of the EU on global systemic challenges. Seven months after COP26, the EU and UK are coordinating to accelerate the pace of a net-zero and climate-resilient transition. At a time of global instability, with growing challenges of inflation, debt and food insecurity, we are united in our determination to uphold the Glasgow Climate Pact and ensure the success of the legacy of COP26.

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European Court of Rights censures Bulgaria for homophobic murder https://egs-schuetzen.com/european-court-of-rights-censures-bulgaria-for-homophobic-murder/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:58:35 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/european-court-of-rights-censures-bulgaria-for-homophobic-murder/ The building of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in Strasbourg, France. Photo: EPA-EFE. The European Court of Human Rights ruled on Tuesday that Bulgaria must compensate Hristina Stoyanova, whose 26-year-old son was the victim of a homophobic murder in Sofia in September 2008. The court said Bulgaria should pay Stoyanova 7,000 euros in […]]]>
The building of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in Strasbourg, France. Photo: EPA-EFE.

The European Court of Human Rights ruled on Tuesday that Bulgaria must compensate Hristina Stoyanova, whose 26-year-old son was the victim of a homophobic murder in Sofia in September 2008.

The court said Bulgaria should pay Stoyanova 7,000 euros in damages and 3,183.90 euros in costs and expenses for violating the European Convention on Human Rights.

The death of medical student Mihail Stoyanov was one of the most publicized homophobic crimes in Bulgarian history.

The three attackers were high school students who patrolled the capital’s Borisova Gradina park looking for people they thought were gay and decided to attack Stoyanov. The next morning, a passerby found her body and called the police.

The European Court held that, although the local courts had clearly established that the reason for the murder was the perpetrators’ hatred of LGBT people, this had no legal consequences because the Bulgarian criminal code does not cite homophobia as aggravating factor. .

The attackers were arrested in 2010, and two of them were convicted of aggravated murder. The other appeared as a witness at trial.

“This long-awaited ruling brings justice to all people in the LGBTI community,” Radoslav Stoyanov, an LGBT activist and member of the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee, said in a statement.

“When the perpetrator’s motive is based on the sexual orientation, gender identity or gender characteristics of the victim, it threatens all people who have the same orientation, gender identity or characteristics. If a person is killed today because they are homosexual, I, as a homosexual, have every reason to fear that I am a potential target,” he added.

Since the murder of Mihail Stoyanov, there have been various other homophobic crimes in Bulgaria.

In October 2020, gay teenagers were attacked by football hooligans in the city of Plovdiv.

In the spring of 2021, as Bulgaria went through an election cycle that saw voter turnout for far-right parties plummet, several assaults were reportedly staged by factions close to some fringe nationalist groups.

Last November, shortly before the general and presidential elections, an LGBT community center called Rainbow Hub was attacked by Boyan Rassate, a presidential candidate, who was later arrested.

In a recent development on June 14, the Municipality of Sofia refused to grant citizenship to “baby Sarah”, the daughter of a same-sex couple, a Bulgarian and British citizen, who had married Gibraltar.

Since her birth in 2019, their daughter has been stateless because according to Spanish law, the child could not acquire Spanish citizenship because neither woman was a Spanish citizen.

Although born in British territory, the child was also denied British citizenship because one cannot transfer citizenship to one’s child.

The refusal by the Municipality of Sofia came despite the fact that in December the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that the child should be issued a Bulgarian passport and that the family should be able to move freely in all Member States of the European Union.

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Europe must not let the momentum of expansion slip away https://egs-schuetzen.com/europe-must-not-let-the-momentum-of-expansion-slip-away/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 11:00:12 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/europe-must-not-let-the-momentum-of-expansion-slip-away/ The writer is director of Carnegie Europe President Volodymyr Zelenskyy may have set aside Ukraine’s goal of joining NATO, but not his ambition to join the EU. Earlier this year, along with Moldova and Georgia, the country took its first steps towards applying for EU membership. With six Balkan countries plus three from Eastern Europe […]]]>

The writer is director of Carnegie Europe

President Volodymyr Zelenskyy may have set aside Ukraine’s goal of joining NATO, but not his ambition to join the EU. Earlier this year, along with Moldova and Georgia, the country took its first steps towards applying for EU membership. With six Balkan countries plus three from Eastern Europe keen to join the club – not counting Turkey – the EU is as much in demand as it is reluctant to respond appropriately.

Brussels risks being damned if it does not respond to these demands, and damned if it does. At the upcoming EU summit, leaders are expected to react to new demands and at the same time decide whether long-serving candidates from North Macedonia and Albania can actually start negotiations – two of many steps on the long road. towards EU membership.

To fail to live up to the historic moment would be the kiss of death to what European leaders have heralded as a geopolitical awakening, with united countries long divided on most things concerning Russia and European security. Leaving aside the countries most vulnerable to threats from Vladimir Putin’s Russia would defeat the purpose of this strategic shift.

But while the EU offers the prospect of membership to three other countries, it must not let its engagement wane along the way, as it did in the Western Balkans. Russia’s disruptive influence in the Balkans has far outweighed its material investment in the region, and Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine are already partially occupied by Russian troops.

On the other hand, if Brussels favored Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia over the Balkans, it would send a signal that it is the conflict that holds Europe’s attention rather than political and economic reform.

The enlargement process, once touted as Europe’s greatest achievement, has stalled for years. The challenges are daunting: the Western Balkans suffer from unresolved disputes inherited from the dissolution of Yugoslavia, as do the successor states of the Soviet Union in Russian-occupied Eastern Europe. Political and economic reform is a prisoner of corrupt elites.

European leaders stress the governability of a wider and more diverse EU, fear the importation of divisive and corrupt politics from the Western Balkans and now from the three Eastern European countries.

They also attribute the democratic backsliding of some EU member states (notably Hungary and Poland) to joining too quickly in 2004. If Europe cannot reform itself, how can it enlarge its membership? ?

This response is clearly unsuited to the challenge. Moreover, these arguments ring hollow in light of Europe’s own behavior. The setbacks of North Macedonia are emblematic.

Recognized as a candidate for EU membership in 2005, its status was frozen due to a bilateral dispute with Greece. The historic Prespa agreement reached by the two countries in 2018 did not, however, unlock things. The situation in the Balkans began to emerge as an issue in election campaigns across Europe, driven by domestic populism.

In November 2020, Bulgaria blocked North Macedonia from moving towards EU membership amid disputes over history, identity and language. Albania, too, has been drawn into this dispute, despite its own significant reform efforts.

The often tense domestic politics of European countries has seen the bloc lose its way when it comes to foreign policy. The consequence in neighboring countries that are heavily dependent on the EU has been a vicious cycle of corruption, stagnation and democratic backsliding.

As Nikola Dimitrov, the former foreign minister of North Macedonia who was part of the team that negotiated the Prespa agreement, told me: if membership is not considered for 20 years , it does not enter into the political calculation of the Balkan” leadership.

Now that the war in Ukraine has given new impetus to the push for enlargement, proposals are circulating to make up for the lack of a clear accession process and timetable. EU leaders offered ideas – French President Emmanuel Macron set out his vision for a broader “European political community”, while Charles Michel, President of the European Council, envisioned a new “European geopolitical community”. .

But these grand designs do not get to the heart of the matter. Nothing less than genuine engagement with pro-reform elements in countries wishing to join the EU will achieve the goal, as Macron put it, of “building the security architecture that the continent European needs”.

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A group of friends develop an innovative solution to preserve the authenticity of their cities https://egs-schuetzen.com/a-group-of-friends-develop-an-innovative-solution-to-preserve-the-authenticity-of-their-cities/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:11:41 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/a-group-of-friends-develop-an-innovative-solution-to-preserve-the-authenticity-of-their-cities/ June 09, 2022 Mediterranean cities like Valletta (Malta), Cadiz (Spain), Palermo (Sicily) or Zakynthos (a Greek island) are world famous for their ancient historical architecture. But what strikes the visitor is the large number of water tanks and other technical elements covering the roofs, terraces, streets, balconies and even the historic buildings of the cities. […]]]>

June 09, 2022

Mediterranean cities like Valletta (Malta), Cadiz (Spain), Palermo (Sicily) or Zakynthos (a Greek island) are world famous for their ancient historical architecture. But what strikes the visitor is the large number of water tanks and other technical elements covering the roofs, terraces, streets, balconies and even the historic buildings of the cities.

Water reservoirs are particularly useful in places affected by drought, but for Domenico Pititto, founder and CEO of Jebbia, these plastic structures “destroy the authenticity and magic” of Mediterranean towns and villages.

Domenico and his friends, Alessandro Trovato (an expert in circular business models) and Roberta Suppo (an engineer and architect), started talking about this issue during the second lockdown in Italy, in the fall of 2020.

“We reflected and discussed how certain technical elements of our city, in particular the water tanks, had a negative impact on the landscape and the urban heritage of our city,” explains Domenico.

Not only do they degrade the authenticity of urban and architectural heritage (in cities that often depend on tourism for their economic well-being), but research also shows that, if not properly capped, these reservoirs can become a breeding ground for harmful organisms and sediments such as microplastic pollutants to spread.

The three friends had the idea of ​​enhancing the architectural heritage of the Mediterranean cities to which they are particularly attached. Their product, a green cover made of reusable material, will “simply” hide and cover electrical cabins, water tanks, air conditioning motors and other technical elements that invade many roofs and terraces. One unit of their modular garden even has a pocket containing native plants that have been carefully selected for their ability to adapt to different and extreme environments.

A few months after their first discussion, Domenico, Alessandro and Roberta took part in the Hackathon Resto al Sud organized by Invitalia in Bologna and ended up winning the Best Concept Award with Jebbia.

The name they chose for their start-up shows the affiliation that the three friends have for Mediterranean culture, history and architecture. Domenico explains that “Gebbia” is a word of Arabic origin, and in Sicilian it refers to the cisterns found in the countryside which are used to collect water for irrigation.

“Innovation, says Domenico, is about solving problems with sustainable solutions, improving existing technology with new procedures and concepts.”

With Jebbia, the team came up with a versatile solution that has a multitude of beneficial impacts. It “absorbs CO2, improves the quality of water in reservoirs, extends the life of technical elements, and it also reuses technical spaces to increase the urban landscape by creating a dense network of green spots, lowering the phenomenon heat wave and the damage. water bombs”, explains Domenico.

The team participated and won a prize during the 2021 edition of the Climathon organized in Cagliari. Climathon is a local program orchestrated by EIT Climate-KIC that encourages citizens to think about local solutions to transform their city towards a zero carbon economy as well as to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The theme of the ideathon was how to rethink urban landscapes to support adaptation to climate change, and their challenge was around urban voids and residual spaces as drivers of adaptation processes.

“In a few weeks, our first prototype will be ready, and we look forward to collecting the data to improve our project. During this time, we are developing our start-up, adding new professionals to the team as well as partners who will help us enter the market”, explains Domenico.

Jebbia won first prize (€3,000) at the EIT Community New European Bauhaus Ideation Awards, a competition organized by the European Union to celebrate existing beautiful, sustainable and inclusive achievements and help younger generations to further develop the concepts and ideas. emerging. They are now in the running for the Grand Jury Prize at the upcoming EIT Community New European Bauhaus Ideathon awards ceremony taking place during the European New Bauhaus Festival from June 9-12, 2022.

“This award is important for Jebbia, it helps us to promote our project, to strengthen our network, to create relationships with new partners and to share our ideas with other young professionals from all over Europe”, says Domenico.

More information on how to register for the EIT Community’s New European Bauhaus Idea Award Ceremony can be found here.

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Company Highlights: Inflation Remains Elevated, Stocks Recover https://egs-schuetzen.com/company-highlights-inflation-remains-elevated-stocks-recover/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:27:22 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/company-highlights-inflation-remains-elevated-stocks-recover/ ____ The Crypto Collapse Is A Wake Up Call For Many, Including Congress NEW YORK (AP) — Crashes in the cryptocurrency space are common, but the latest has served as a stark reminder that investors, pros and newbies alike, can roll the dice when investing money in digital assets. In a recent two-month period, bitcoin […]]]>

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The Crypto Collapse Is A Wake Up Call For Many, Including Congress

NEW YORK (AP) — Crashes in the cryptocurrency space are common, but the latest has served as a stark reminder that investors, pros and newbies alike, can roll the dice when investing money in digital assets. In a recent two-month period, bitcoin lost almost half of its value and other cryptocurrencies fell even more. Additionally, an area of ​​the cryptocurrency universe that was supposed to be less vulnerable to big swings has suffered a dramatic collapse. Some investors have taken to online forums to share stories of decimated fortunes and even suicidal desperation. With more and more investors taking an interest in digital assets, Washington has been forced to be careful. .

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Yellen: inflation “will remain high”; I hope it “comes down”

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen acknowledged that she and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell “could have used a better word” than transitional to describe the expected run of inflation in the US. American economy. Yellen says she remains hopeful that he will decline. But she told the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday that “I expect inflation to stay high even though I really hope it will come down now.” Yellen added that “lowering inflation” should be the number one priority. The Treasury and the Federal Reserve have been increasingly blamed by lawmakers and the public for allowing inflation to reach record highs.

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World Bank dims outlook for global economy amid war with Russia

WASHINGTON (AP) — The World Bank has sharply downgraded its outlook for the global economy, highlighting Russia’s war on Ukraine, the prospect of widespread food shortages and concerns about the potential return of “stagflation.” – a toxic mix of high inflation and slowing growth not seen in more than four decades. The 189-nation anti-poverty agency predicts the global economy will grow 2.9% this year. That would be down from global growth of 5.7% in 2021 and the 4.1% he forecast for 2022 in January. “For many countries, recession will be difficult to avoid,” said World Bank President David Malpass.

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Faced with huge inventory, Target cuts supplier orders and prices

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is canceling orders from vendors, especially for homewares and apparel, and further slashing prices to clear stockpiled ahead of the critical fall and holiday shopping seasons. The actions come after a pronounced shift in spending by Americans from investing in their homes to spending money on experiences like travel, dinner parties and other pre-pandemic routines. Shoppers are also focusing more on non-discretionary items like groceries, as inflation makes them more selective. It’s a change that has come much faster than major retailers anticipated. The speed at which Americans have moved away from pandemic-related spending has been laid bare in the latest quarterly financial reports from a number of major retailers.

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U.S. solar companies weigh challenge of Biden’s tariff break

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. solar makers are considering legal challenges after President Joe Biden declared a two-year pause on tariffs on solar imports from Southeast Asia. Biden’s action on Monday was aimed at reviving solar installations that have slowed amid a Commerce Department investigation into possible trade violations involving Chinese products. But some domestic producers, including a California company that filed a complaint with Commerce alleging unfair competition from China, said Biden’s actions would help state-subsidized Chinese solar companies at the expense of U.S. producers. The White House said Biden’s actions would boost an industry crucial to his climate change goals without interfering with the trade investigation.

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Mass shootings intensify local reform efforts

Gun control and gun violence intervention advocates hope the mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York, will convince federal and state governments to take action. measures again. Nonprofits like March for Our Lives plan to mobilize supporters on June 11 to push elected officials to demand universal background checks. It’s just a philanthropic effort in a movement that recognizes that politicians haven’t taken meaningful action on gun control in America. Other non-profit, community or advocacy organizations have also understood why gun violence occurs and how to reduce it, including interventions not dependent on passage of legislation.

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One plug and you’re done: EU will demand a common way to charge phones

LONDON (AP) — European Union officials have agreed to new rules requiring a uniform charging cord for smartphones and other devices. This decision would make life easier for consumers who are tired of digging through a tangle of cables to find the right one. EU negotiators said on Tuesday they had signed a provisional deal on a “one-stop charging solution”. It’s part of a broader effort to make products sold in the 27-nation bloc more sustainable and reduce e-waste. The new rules will come into force in autumn 2024 and mean that consumers in the EU will only need to use a common USB Type-C cable for small and medium-sized rechargeable portable electronic devices.

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Stocks rally as uncertainties keep Wall Street faltering

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied on Tuesday as Treasury yields fell, but Wall Street remains shaky as investors wait for more clarity on the direction interest rates, inflation and inflation are headed. the economy. The S&P 500 climbed 1% after rebounding from an early loss of the same size. Technology stocks were among the main forces driving the market. Energy producers’ inventories also rose along with oil prices. That helped overshadow problems at Target, which warned of declining profit margins as it slashed prices to eliminate inventory. JM Smucker soared on strong quarterly results.

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Environmental groups challenge EU support for gas projects

BRUSSELS (AP) — Environmental groups have filed a lawsuit against the European Commission challenging the inclusion of 30 gas projects on a list of priority deals deemed beneficial to the bloc’s energy market. Activists said on Tuesday that the European Commission had granted “these climate-destroying projects VIP status, in contradiction to its legal obligations”. The groups’ legal action came as European lawmakers debated on Tuesday proposals for the Commission’s ‘Fit for 55’ package to meet EU climate targets of cutting greenhouse gas emissions. origin of global warming of 55% during this decade.

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No justice reform in Poland, no money, EU chief pledges

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has said Poland will not receive money from an EU pandemic relief fund until the right-wing government rolls back measures intended to limit the independence of the judiciary. Poland should receive nearly 36 billion euros to help its economy recover. But the EU has frozen its access to funds amid concerns over political control over the justice system. The committee insists that a disciplinary chamber for Polish judges be abolished, that its regulations be rewritten and that judges sanctioned by the chamber have their cases reviewed. Von der Leyen told European lawmakers on Tuesday that “no money will be disbursed until these reforms are undertaken.” Some lawmakers are skeptical.

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The S&P 500 rose 39.25 points, or 1%, to 4,160.68. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 264.36 points, or 0.8%, to 33,180.14. The Nasdaq gained 113.86 points, or 0.9%, to 12,175.23. The Russell 2000 Small Business Index rose 29.68 points, or 1.6%, to 1,919.56.

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50 years after Ireland voted to join, what is the relationship between the two? https://egs-schuetzen.com/50-years-after-ireland-voted-to-join-what-is-the-relationship-between-the-two/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/50-years-after-ireland-voted-to-join-what-is-the-relationship-between-the-two/ 50 YEARS AGO, Ireland voted to join the EEC, or at least that’s what the EU was called then. Having faced more challenges in recent years than at any time in its history, the EU appears to have a united front following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. In this post-Brexit union, it looks like Ireland is […]]]>

50 YEARS AGO, Ireland voted to join the EEC, or at least that’s what the EU was called then.

Having faced more challenges in recent years than at any time in its history, the EU appears to have a united front following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

In this post-Brexit union, it looks like Ireland is rising to the contribution challenge and deepening its relationship with Europe, despite fears that UK withdrawal could lead to a move away from the union state. .

It therefore seemed appropriate to us that for this anniversary, The newspaper turns its attention to Ireland-EU relations for this month’s topic on The Good Information Project.

The 1972 referendum which proposed Ireland’s membership of the then European Economic Community (EEC) resulted in the highest turnout to date in Ireland. A record 70.88% of the electorate went to the polls with Ireland joining on 1 January 1973. 83% voted in favor of joining.

In recent years Ireland has moved from being a net recipient to a net contributor. Until 2013, Ireland received more funds than it contributed to the EU. Since 2013, however, Ireland has become one of the highest contributors per capita. In 2018, Ireland’s contribution was the second highest of all Member States per capita.

In general, the Irish seem to be happier than most other Member States in terms of optimism about the future of the EU.

A 2022 Eurobarometer report for Ireland showed that 88% of respondents were optimistic about the future of the EU. 71% said they had a positive image of the EU, which was the highest among Member States, well above the EU average of 44%.

81% of Irish respondents said they were satisfied with the way democracy works in the EU, compared to a European average of 56%.

However, Ireland seems to be an exception most often in terms of attitude towards the EU. For example, in a more general Standard Eurobarometer survey, only 32% of respondents in France said they trusted the EU, compared to 63% of Irish respondents.

This same report showed that more Irish participants trusted the EU (63%) than they trusted the Irish government (50%).

As of January 1, 2022, the Irish language has become an official and working language of the European Union, which means that all official documents must be translated into Irish. It also allows MPs and other officials to address parliament in Irish.

Laws and security

Ireland has undergone immense changes, both socially and economically, over the past 50 years, many of which have been attributed to the state’s joining the European Union.

Laws that have become standard in Ireland, such as those relating to employment and equality which protect workers’ rights, began as EU directives. For example, the right to at least four weeks of paid annual leave per year as well as maternity and parental leave protections are the result of EU legislation.

Efforts to reduce emissions and become carbon neutral are also in the hands of the EU.

A Standard Eurobarometer survey conducted between January and February showed that the most important issue facing the EU at that time was climate change (26%).

As a result of its membership, Ireland has emission reduction targets in place.

In 2019, two of Ireland’s seats in the European Parliament were won by members of the Green Party, up from zero in 2014. This marked a shift among the general population and young voters towards the importance of the fight against the climate change.

Although it was carried out before the invasion of Ukraine, the survey also showed that 77% of Europeans were in favor of a defense and security policy common to the Member States.

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Ireland has long retained its status as a neutral state; however, the debate has resurfaced in recent months with the invasion of Ukraine. In an unprecedented move, the EU announced that it would finance the purchase of arms and other equipment for Ukraine.

Foreign Secretary Simon Coveney said Ireland’s contribution would go to the “non-lethal” elements of the package and would not fund arms. Taoiseach Michael Martin said it would be unthinkable for the EU not to send arms to Ukraine.

This month, The Good Information Project examines the EU and its relationship with Ireland, how the EU works and explores how our membership is valuable to Irish people while providing facts and information to help make the most of the benefit from our membership in a shared economic and cultural union.

What would an ideal European Union look like? And what would it take to make it a reality?

Over the next few weeks we will be looking at all of this to see how the EU is working for Ireland.

We want to hear from you

The newspaper launched The Good Information Project with the aim of engaging readers to dig deeper with us into the key issues affecting Ireland at the moment.

You can stay up to date by signing up for The Good Information Project newsletter in the box below. If you would like to join the discussion, ask questions or share your thoughts on this or other topics, you can find our Facebook group here or contact us directly via WhatsApp.

This work is also co-funded by Journal Media and a grant program from the European Parliament. Any opinions or conclusions expressed in this work are those of the author. The European Parliament has no involvement or responsibility for the editorial content published by the project. For more information, see here.

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How Baker McKenzie Attys helped Ukraine apply to join the EU https://egs-schuetzen.com/how-baker-mckenzie-attys-helped-ukraine-apply-to-join-the-eu/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 00:03:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/how-baker-mckenzie-attys-helped-ukraine-apply-to-join-the-eu/ By Emilie Lever | June 3, 2022, 8:03 p.m. EDT · Listen to the article Your browser does not support the audio element. Ukraine-based lawyers for Baker McKenzie LLP helped prepare the war-torn country’s bid to join the European Union, which was submitted last month during the ongoing Russian invasion. A dozen lawyers, mostly based […]]]>

By Emilie Lever | June 3, 2022, 8:03 p.m. EDT
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