European Community – EGS Schuetzen http://egs-schuetzen.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:16:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://egs-schuetzen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png European Community – EGS Schuetzen http://egs-schuetzen.com/ 32 32 Renewable energies? Yes! At all costs? Nope! – EURACTIV.com https://egs-schuetzen.com/renewable-energies-yes-at-all-costs-nope-euractiv-com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:16:15 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/renewable-energies-yes-at-all-costs-nope-euractiv-com/ In the name of accelerating the energy transition and filling the vacuum left by Russian gas, the European Commission risks pushing a proposal that is not only potentially damaging to the environment but also undemocratic, writes Zoltan Kun. Zoltan Kun is a nature conservationist and wilderness advocate. The proposal for a Council Regulation to accelerate […]]]>

In the name of accelerating the energy transition and filling the vacuum left by Russian gas, the European Commission risks pushing a proposal that is not only potentially damaging to the environment but also undemocratic, writes Zoltan Kun.

Zoltan Kun is a nature conservationist and wilderness advocate.

The proposal for a Council Regulation to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy, due to be adopted by the Energy Council on November 24, states that renewable energy projects and the expansion of the energy network are “presumed to be in the public interest superior and serve public health and safety”. – thus allowing projects to proceed with only cursory environmental scrutiny in Natura 2000 sites and designated National Protected Areas.

While provisions to accelerate the deployment of solar energy on existing structures and increase the installation of heat pumps make sense, the prospect of energy infrastructure development in protected areas and logging for biomass is scary.

The proposal admits that the European Commission has not carried out any assessment, which means that no one has demonstrated that the development of protected areas is necessary to meet the renewable energy objectives. For the NGO community, it is clear that the proposal is a way to whitewash the gutting of the Habitats and Birds Directives.

And while Commission staff generally work to preserve and restore natural systems, the Commission’s proposed Council Regulation echoes and effectively supports the mentality set out in a recent open letter from the forest industry which attacks setting aside forest areas for wilderness areas. These interests want to dominate the land and ensure that every plot is fully put into use for profit.

The rapid and undemocratic grabbing of irreplaceable resources in the name of accelerating clean energy deployment is reminiscent of Hungary’s 2006 Law LIII on Accelerating and Simplifying the Implementation of Investments of Major Economic Importance.

The Hungarian Parliament initially passed this law to ensure more efficient implementation of EU-funded projects. However, the law has been amended several times since 2006 and is now used to promote projects that violate local interests and often present a high risk of corruption and misappropriation of national and European public funds.

A group of Hungarian NGOs sent a letter to various EU commissioners on September 8, 2022 asking for the abolition of this law as part of the negotiations on the rule of law in Hungary. In Hungary, fast-track regulations have been used for land grabbing, with the state helping to take land when a landowner was unwilling to hand it over to a solar company.

Without being so drastic, the anti-democratic nature of the Council regulation recalls this Hungarian model.

Responding to outcry from NGOs over the Council’s proposal, European Commission Vice-President Frans Timmermans says their concerns are misplaced – that environmental protections will be maintained by “focusing on areas where there are solid evidence that there would be no problems”.

But, by unilaterally disarming and rolling back key protections in flagship EU environmental legislation, the proposal dismantles the only tool policymakers have to protect these irreplaceable ecosystems.

Moreover, the proposal makes little sense since many projects that will be fast-tracked will actually take years to implement, with or without environmental impact assessments or public consultations.

If the goal is to accelerate the deployment of low-impact solar panels and heat pumps, then by all means they should – but leave protected areas alone, where big projects will take a toll anyway. years to unfold (other than cutting down forests for fuel – something the proposal should explicitly prohibit, but does not).

European and national policymakers need to take a holistic approach to accelerating and scaling up renewable energy deployment, where climate, energy and biodiversity policies are mutually reinforcing. Any action that creates legal uncertainty, sidesteps democratic decision-making and undermines existing environmental and public participation provisions is damaging, as we race against time to stem both biodiversity loss and climate change. . The lack of a holistic approach and legal clarity could also lead to further delays in clearance rather than expediting the process as intended.

We have already seen in Hungary what national governments are capable of, given their desire to tear up the protections established at EU level. Why give them more tools to do it?

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Montenegro’s reliance on its coal-fired power plant is holding back the country’s energy transition https://egs-schuetzen.com/montenegros-reliance-on-its-coal-fired-power-plant-is-holding-back-the-countrys-energy-transition/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 23:14:31 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/montenegros-reliance-on-its-coal-fired-power-plant-is-holding-back-the-countrys-energy-transition/ Like almost every morning, the mist slowly rises in the Pljevlja valley. It’s a particularly mild autumn this year, but the pungent smell of coal is already permeating this small town nestled in the dense forests of northeast Montenegro. The coal mine, close to the city center, is in full swing. Engineer Bogoljub Djondovic, who […]]]>

Like almost every morning, the mist slowly rises in the Pljevlja valley. It’s a particularly mild autumn this year, but the pungent smell of coal is already permeating this small town nestled in the dense forests of northeast Montenegro. The coal mine, close to the city center, is in full swing.

Engineer Bogoljub Djondovic, who was born and raised here, works at the mine. “It’s simple, without the power plant and the coal mine, there is no Montenegro,” he says. Djondovic is also the president of the union organization of the Pljevlja coal mine, the SORUP (Sindikalna organizacija Rudnik uglja Pljevlja). “Our economy could no longer function, because we have almost no industry left. For years, government policy focused solely on tourism and almost all of our manufacturing businesses closed. The only industry still standing, and the one that keeps Montenegro running, is Pljevlja!

The Pljelvlja coal-fired power plant, which has been in operation for 40 years, is the only thermal power plant in Montenegro and has a capacity of 230 MW. Depending on the time of year, it provides between 40 and 50% of the electricity supply for this small country of 620,000 inhabitants which gained independence from Serbia in 2006.

Lignite continues to be one of the main sources of income for the 27,000 inhabitants of the commune. “A large part of the jobs in the region are linked to the thermal power station and the mine,” explains Velibor Tomcic, president of the Pljevlja power station union, the STP (Sindikat Termoelektrane Pljevlja). “Despite the job losses caused by automation, our companies are still the largest and most important not only in the municipality, but in all of Montenegro.”

“We are currently celebrating 40 years of operation of the plant and a generation is retiring but others are taking their place. As a union, we want to see as many young people as possible join such essential businesses as the power plant and the coal mine.

In July 2022, 1,045 people in Pljevlja were employed by the country’s main electricity supplier, the state-owned company Elektroprivreda Crne Gore (EPCG). With a salary of over €1,000, higher than the average gross salary of €886 in Montenegro, jobs at the plant are still in high demand in the region.

But if the country wants to meet its commitments in terms of carbon emissions, the plant may have to close in ten years. In 2021, then Prime Minister Zdravko Krivokapić announced that Montenegro would phase out coal by 2035, at the latest.

Like the other power stations built during the socialist era in Yugoslavia (1945-1992), the Pljevlja lignite power station is one of the most polluting in Europe. Its dust and sulfur dioxide (SO₂) emissions seriously affect the health of local residents. “The future of Pljevlja is at the heart of Montenegro’s climate goals, as the plant is the biggest polluter in the country: its emissions represent between 80 and 90% of Montenegro’s total greenhouse gas emissions,” explains Natasa. Kovacevic, heating manager. sector decarbonization campaign for the NGO Bankwatch.

“According to 2016 data, Pljevlja is a city with 133 premature deaths per year and a high level of respiratory diseases, cancers and other chronic diseases. The city has been suffering for over 40 years now and it has to stop. According to the World Health Organization, Pljevlja is one of the ten most polluted cities in Europe and 22% of all deaths are due to air pollution.

A transition viewed with suspicion

With regard to the Paris agreements and the European Green Pact, the country, which has been a candidate for membership of the European Union since 2010, is poorly positioned to meet its commitments in terms of environmental standards, particularly in terms of carbon emissions.

The Energy Community Secretariat opened proceedings against the country in April 2021 after TPP Pljevlja had already exceeded its quota of 20,000 operating hours for the period 2018-2023 at the end of 2020. According to environmental NGOs, the fact that the plant is currently operating illegally illustrates the discrepancy between the stated position of the authorities on climate issues on the international scene and the reality on the ground.

“Officially, we have to prepare a whole series of documents that respond to the commitments that the country has signed, but nothing has been done yet,” laments Sanja Orlandic, secretary general of the NGO Green Home.

“The first thing we need to do is draw up our National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP), which should set the date for the closure of the Pljevlja thermal power plant. We don’t have that kind of information yet, and we don’t even have a plan or a vision of what we need to do in the years to come.

Montenegro has often been a forerunner. In 1992, it became an “ecological state”, as provided for in its constitution. And yet, the exit from fossil fuels is struggling to arouse the interest of a society with deep political divisions. The country is regularly shaken by identity issues, pushing climate issues to the background.

Workers view the “energy transition” prescribed by the European Commission with skepticism. “After the collapse of Yugoslavia 30 years ago, we already experienced the economic transition from an industrial economy to a service economy, which involved widespread privatization,” says Vladimir Krsmanovic of the Confederation of Trade Unions of Montenegro (SSCG – Saveza sindikata Crne Gore). “In the end, it was the workers who paid the bill for this transition, with job cuts and the ‘social plans’ that closed their factories. So, when they hear about transition, the workers say: “No, thank you!”, because we’ve been in transition for 30 years!” The ruined factories around Pljevlja bear witness to the severity of the economic and social shock suffered by workers in the former Yugoslavia in recent decades.

The legacy of the transition to a market economy means that very few people are receptive to the arguments for a new “green transition” and the decarbonisation of the energy sector. Courted or questioned by the political parties during the election period, the workers of Pljevlja do not believe in the change of course announced by certain politicians. In July 2021, under pressure from the European Union, the Prime Minister even declared that the plant would probably be closed in 2030.

“I don’t think Montenegro will be ready to shut down the thermal power plant in 2030,” says SORUP’s Bogoljub Djondovic. “It’s just not feasible, especially when looking at the situation from an economic and long-term perspective.”

“The main problem is the lack of vision of our politicians: they act like managers, appoint incompetent people to positions of responsibility, just to control them better. As a result, no one in Montenegro seriously thinks about the prospect of closing Pljevlja. »

Far from slowing down their activities, the power station and the mines of Pljevlja are currently operating at full speed. The winter promises to be difficult and Montenegrin lignite seems to be establishing itself as a safe bet in a global context marked by uncertainty and multiple crises.

This summer, EPCG officials agreed to sell 300,000 tonnes of coal to neighboring Serbia, and exports by truck to the nearby border are well underway. “The current economic crisis means that we are working harder than ever to overcome the electricity shortage in the market,” says STP’s Velibor Tomcic. “The thermal power plant must also locally compensate for the drop in production of our hydroelectric power plants, because the water level is low this year.” At a time when the efficiency of hydroelectricity is increasingly challenged by repeated periods of drought, the Mediterranean country is in the process of launching its first solar farm projects.

Political crisis and climate skepticism

Everyone in Pljevlja knows someone who suffers from the pollution caused by the power station. But very few dare to complain openly, because the end of coal could mean the death of a city whose population has been almost halved in 50 years.

For Velibor Tomcic, this suffering is the price to pay for the energy independence of Montenegro. “We are well aware of the pollution caused by the plant, but this plant provides our country and society as a whole with tremendous energy security, and that is something we are proud of. We are betting a lot on the ecological reconstruction that is underway at the plant and we hope that this will reduce the various types of pollution, both in terms of wastewater and GHG emissions.

Impossible to know what will be the real impact of this “ecological reconstruction” of 60 million euros, as the project is not very transparent. The fact that BB Solar, a company headed by Blazo Djukanovic, the son of President Milo Djukanovic, is part of the Chinese-Montenegrin consortium that won the tender has raised a lot of criticism, but also concerns about the efficiency of the Environmental Standards.

Two years ago, Djukanovic’s Democratic Party of Socialists (DPS) lost power after 30 years of continuous rule. Since these elections, Montenegro seems plunged into an interminable political crisis, without a government or a parliamentary majority. This instability prevents the country from moving forward on issues related to the climate emergency.

“According to a recent Ipsos poll, 31% of Montenegrins do not believe in climate change,” says Natasa Kovacevic of the NGO Bankwatch.

“Yet we are increasingly affected by extreme weather events, such as droughts and floods. The challenge is immense, but people still do not fully understand the issues. The country needs leaders who have a clear vision of the energy transition and the just transition. Otherwise, we will be stuck with hasty reforms, the implementation of which will be difficult to control. Such reforms will be difficult and complex to manage if guided by short-term thinking.

While the Montenegrin trade unions are, as elsewhere, confronted with the individualization of labor relations and the fragmentation of society, their leaders fear the consequences of an unplanned exit from coal. “The state should propose a job replacement strategy, and not just any jobs, but quality jobs in sectors with a future,” argues Vladimir Krsmanovic of the SSCG. “Because if we solve this problem by just closing the mine and sending everyone into retirement, Pljevlja will die. We all need to take a more proactive approach and develop a sustainable strategy that will meet the need for a stable economy.

Against the backdrop of the global energy crisis and repeated droughts impacting the performance of hydroelectric power stations, the end of coal is not yet on the agenda in Montenegro. And the authorities are indeed studying the possibility of opening new lignite mines in the Pljevlja region.

This article has been translated from French.

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The 2°C target is within reach but more ambitious commitments are needed for 1.5°C https://egs-schuetzen.com/the-2c-target-is-within-reach-but-more-ambitious-commitments-are-needed-for-1-5c/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:16:20 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/the-2c-target-is-within-reach-but-more-ambitious-commitments-are-needed-for-1-5c/ New medium-term goals and long-term net-zero commitments, ambitious policy initiatives and technological development are helping to limit future global warming to around 1.8°C. This is a considerable improvement on the previous projection of around 2.7°C made by the European Commission’s Joint Research Center (JRC). However, achieving the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C target will require substantial and […]]]>

New medium-term goals and long-term net-zero commitments, ambitious policy initiatives and technological development are helping to limit future global warming to around 1.8°C.

This is a considerable improvement on the previous projection of around 2.7°C made by the European Commission’s Joint Research Center (JRC).

However, achieving the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C target will require substantial and timely additional efforts by the entire international community, and in particular major emitters.

This is the main message highlighted by JRC scientists in their Global Energy and Climate Outlook (GECO) 2021 report released today, which provides an updated assessment of global climate commitments and projections of possible increases. temperature futures.

This year’s publication offers a global view of decarbonization scenarios as well as a deep dive into G20 countries, which account for around 75% of global GHG emissions since 1990.

For each of the G20 countries, the outlook assesses multiple emission pathways taking into account currently implemented policies, the most recent goals and commitments, and more ambitious global action that would put the world on the right path. to keep global warming to 1.5°C.

GECO 2021 stresses that substantial additional action will be required if the targets recently announced by several major economies are to be met, and that even greater action will be required to achieve a 1.5°C target.

The report also reveals potential reduction options across sectors, technologies and countries to align emissions with these goals, and provides in-depth analysis of global trends in energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ).

Towards climate neutrality

This year, the GECO 2021 report focuses on climate action driven by the latest commitments made under the Paris Agreement. The new edition takes stock of updates to the medium-term Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and long-term Net Zero Emissions (LTS) goals, as submitted before and during the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP 26) in November 2021.

The report also assesses how recent LTS announcements by major global economies – which include some net-zero emissions targets – could affect the global effort for the low-carbon transition in the coming decades.

The GECO 2021 report shows that the recently announced targets for the short term (2030) and the long term (2050) would represent a clear break with historical trends and current policies.

The GECO 2021 analysis shows that if all countries meet these newly announced national targets (targets submitted in official UNFCCC documents or simply announced), the global temperature increase could be limited to 1.8°C from here 2100 (50% probability).

This figure is significantly lower than that assessed in previous editions of GECO; in 2019, the outlook calculated a temperature change of 2.7°C in an NDC scenario, with emissions not stabilizing until 2035-2040.

The new NDCs and LTS peak emissions around 2023, reducing them until 2050 and then stabilizing in the middle of the century, closing more than 80% of the emission gap around 1.5°C. An interesting feature common to all scenarios is that all show long-term stabilized emissions, with no discernible rebound induced by economic growth. This suggests a true decarbonization of our economic systems, where growth is decoupled from rising emissions.

Global Primary Energy Supply by Fuel, 1.5°C-Uniform Scenario

© EU 2021

However, substantial additional actions are needed to limit climate change to 1.5°C by 2100, as stipulated in the Paris Agreement and reaffirmed by parties to the Paris Agreement at COP26 in Glasgow.

The 1.5°C temperature goal requires global GHG emissions to decline rapidly over the next few decades and reach net zero by the start of the second half of the century.

Therefore, more ambitious targets are needed, both in the short term to achieve a steeper decline in emissions by 2030, and in the long term, as some large emitters have not yet adopted a net zero or only aim after 2050.

On top of that, strong action is needed for countries to achieve the goals they have already set themselves, as shown by the distance between current policies and NDC-LTS scenarios.

The transition to a low-carbon economy would initially rely mainly on the electricity generation sector. While a reduction in coal is the most significant change in primary energy consumption when moving from current policies to the NDC-LTS scenario, reaching the 1.5°C target would imply a sharp reduction in all fuels fossils.

In 2019, more than three-quarters (83%) of global energy demand was still met by fossil fuels, despite the significant growth in renewable energy over the previous decade. Fossil fuels represent only 29% of the energy supply in the 1.5C-Uniform scenario in 2050.

world_primary_energy_supply_fue_l-5c_uniform_scenario.png

Global GHG emissions (left) and global average temperature increase (right)

© EU 2021

By aiming for the 1.5°C target, alongside achieving mostly carbon-free electricity generation, significant efforts are being made to improve energy efficiency, advance electrification and reduce emissions from climate change. land use.

Emission reductions are needed at all levels and the corresponding transition may have implications for the sectoral composition of employment. GECO 2021 provides insight into the labor market transition behind low carbon pathways.

Background

In 2019, the EU announced its target to become climate neutral by 2050. This target was confirmed as part of EU climate law, alongside a commitment to reduce emissions by at least 55% by 2030 from 1990 levels (previous 2030 target was at least -40%). In order to achieve these reinforced objectives, the European Commission proposed the “Fit for 55” legislative package in July 2021.

However, as the EU accounts for only 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions, the challenge of limiting global warming must be taken up on a global level.

Several major emitters like the United States, China and India have recently announced climate change commitments that bring the world closer to the Paris Agreement target. GECO 2021 aims to reveal the implications of these pledges for emissions, energy systems and labor markets around the world, informing the global stocktaking process.

This GECO report is the seventh edition of the GECO series. It contributes to the work of the RCC in the context of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which have recently called for action urgent coordinated global meeting on the climate crisis, unequivocally caused by human activities. .

Related content

JRC Report – Global Energy and Climate Outlook 2021: Towards Climate Neutrality

GECO 2021 webpage on the Science Hub

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Calliditas Therapeutics: Interim Report Q3, 2022 https://egs-schuetzen.com/calliditas-therapeutics-interim-report-q3-2022/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 06:13:00 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/calliditas-therapeutics-interim-report-q3-2022/ Conditional marketing authorization in the EU granted for Kinpeygo® STOCKHOLM, November 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — “On July 15th the European Commission issued conditional marketing authorization for Kinpeygo, which marked the first time a drug has gained approval for this rare disease in the EU. We immediately started the process of transferring the marketing authorization to […]]]>

Conditional marketing authorization in the EU granted for Kinpeygo®

STOCKHOLM, November 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — “On July 15th the European Commission issued conditional marketing authorization for Kinpeygo, which marked the first time a drug has gained approval for this rare disease in the EU. We immediately started the process of transferring the marketing authorization to our European partner, STADA Arzneimittel AG, in order to allow a launch in Europe as quickly as possible. STADA initially launches the product in Germanywith other European countries to follow over time.

With approval and ongoing commercial efforts in the United States and Europewe look forward to the regulatory process in China, where our partner, Everest Medicines, expects to receive notice of acceptance of the NDA from the NMPA this quarter. We are delighted to support Everest in working with regulators. China, who are expected to make a decision on a possible approval in the second half of next year. If Nefecon is approved, it would be the first and only drug approved for the esteemed by Everest 5m IgAN patients proven by biopsy in China.

In the United States, we continue to build on our early commercial successes. TARPEYO net sales increased 94% from the second quarter, resulting in TARPEYO net sales of 123.4 million Swedish crowns ($12.1 million) for Q3. There is an increasing number of nephrologists choosing to prescribe TARPEYO, with 166 new prescribers added in the third quarter, bringing the total number of unique prescribers to 480 at the end of the quarter. We continue to see an ongoing surge of interest that reflects the natural cadence of nephrology visits, which is consistent with our expectations for this rather quiet progressive disease. We expect to achieve net sales of TARPEYO for the year between $3540mwhich aligns with our internal plans for 2022. We also expect significant continued growth in 2023 as nephrologists become more familiar with clinical data, access becomes easier, and key data in Part B of the NefIgArd trial become available.

We were delighted to be able to publish the Part A data in Kidney International in October 2022, as regulators have also released their review assessments. This dataset, showing an increasing reduction in proteinuria in the overall patient population over the 9 months of treatment as well as a significant continued reduction in proteinuria in the overall study population at over the following 3 months when no medication was given, showing a highly differentiated profile. The importance of this data was confirmed by countless interactions during the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) Kidney Week in early November, where we had the opportunity to engage not only with KOLs, but with the wider nephrology community treating IgAN patients.

CEO Renée Aguiar-Lucander

Summary of Q3 2022

July 1 – September 30

  • Net sales amounted to 260.1 million Swedish crownsincluding TARPEYO® net sales amounted to 123.4 million Swedish crownsfor the three months ended September 30, 2022. For the three months ended September 30, 2021 net sales amounted to 198.2 million Swedish crowns and no net sale of TARPEYO was recorded.
  • Operating income amounted to (36.2 million Swedish crowns) and 7.9 million Swedish crowns for the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively.
  • Earnings/(loss) per share before and after dilution amount to (0.17SEK) and SEK0.21 for the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively.
  • The cash amounted to 736.2 million Swedish crowns and 1,163.8 million Swedish crowns of the September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

Highlights of Q3 2022, in a nutshell

  • In July 2022, Calliditas announced that the European Commission (EC) has granted conditional marketing authorization for Kinpeygo for the treatment of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) in adults at risk of rapid disease progression with a protein ratio urine/creatinine (UPCR) ≥ 1.5 g/gram . Kinpeygo is an orphan drug and became the first and only approved treatment for IgAN in the EU. Kinpeygo will be marketed in the European Economic Area (EEA) exclusively by STADA Arzneimittel AG. Subsequently, in September 2022Calliditas has transferred its marketing authorization for Kinpeygo to its European business partner, STADA Arzneimittel AG, which will initially launch in Germanywith other European countries to follow.

Investor Presentation November 14, 2022 2:00 p.m. CET

Audio distribution with teleconferencing, Q3 2022

Webcast: https://ir.financialhearings.com/calliditas-therapeutics-q3-2022

Teleconference: SE: +46850558350 UK: +443333009265 US: +16467224956

For more information, please contact:

Mary GalayHead of International Relations, Calliditas
Such. : +44 79 55 12 98 45, e-mail: [email protected]

The information contained in the press release is information that Calliditas is required to make public in accordance with the EU Market Abuse Regulation. The information was sent for publication, through the contact persons indicated above, on November 14, 2022 at 07:00 CET.

About Calliditas

Calliditas Therapeutics is a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company based in Stockholm, Sweden focused on the identification, development and commercialization of new treatments in orphan indications, with an initial focus on kidney and liver diseases with significant unmet medical needs. Calliditas’ lead product, developed under the name Nefecon, obtained accelerated FDA approval under the trade name TARPEYO® and conditional marketing authorization by the European Commission under the trade name Kinpeygo®. Kinpeygo is marketed in member states of the European Union by Calliditas’ partner, STADA Arzneimittel AG. In addition, Calliditas conducts a Phase 2b/3 clinical trial in primary biliary cholangitis and a phase 2 proof-of-concept trial in head and neck cancer with its NOX inhibitor product candidate, setanaxib. Calliditas’ ordinary shares are listed on Nasdaq Stockholm (ticker: CALTX) and its American Depositary Shares are listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market (ticker: CALT).

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended, including, without limitation, statements regarding strategy, marketing efforts, business plans, regulatory submissions, clinical development plans, revenue and product sales projections or forecasts and concentration. The words “may”, “will”, “could”, “would”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “anticipate”, “intend”, “believe”, ” estimates”, “predicts”, “project”, “potential”, “continue”, “target” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain such identifying words. All forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based on management’s current expectations and beliefs and are subject to a number of important risks, uncertainties and factors that may cause actual events or results to differ. differ materially from those expressed or implied by any forward-looking statement. the forward-looking statements contained in this press release, including, without limitation, those relating to Calliditas’ business, operations, continued and additional regulatory approvals for TARPEYO and Kinpeygo, market acceptance of TARPEYO and Kinpeygo, clinical trials, supply chain, strategy, targets and forecasts, timelines, competition from other biopharmaceutical companies, revenue and product sales projections or forecasts and other risks identified in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in Calliditas’ reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Calliditas cautions you not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date they are made. Calliditas disclaims any obligation to publicly update or revise any such statements to reflect any change in expectations or in events, conditions or circumstances on which such statements may be based, or which may affect the likelihood that actual results will differ from those statements. in forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements contained in this press release represent the views of Calliditas only as of the date hereof and should not be relied upon as representing its views as of any subsequent date.

The following files are available for download:

SOURCE Calliditas Therapeutics

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Martin meets Sunak at Anglo-Irish Council summit https://egs-schuetzen.com/martin-meets-sunak-at-anglo-irish-council-summit/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 18:11:15 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/martin-meets-sunak-at-anglo-irish-council-summit/ Taoiseach Micheál Martin met British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak at the Anglo-Irish Council summit in Blackpool. It is the first time a British Prime Minister has attended the council since Gordon Brown in 2007. The purpose of the Anglo-Irish Council, created by the Good Friday Agreement, is to foster cooperation between the nations of the […]]]>

Taoiseach Micheál Martin met British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak at the Anglo-Irish Council summit in Blackpool.

It is the first time a British Prime Minister has attended the council since Gordon Brown in 2007.

The purpose of the Anglo-Irish Council, created by the Good Friday Agreement, is to foster cooperation between the nations of the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Mr Sunak said: “Actually, Taoiseach, I’m delighted to give you a proper welcome to Blackpool.

“It’s great to join you on the Anglo-Irish Council, especially, I thought to myself, as we approach the 25th anniversary of the Belfast Good Friday Agreement, from which this council grew.

“I have spoken before about the vital importance of a strong relationship between the UK and Ireland, and I sincerely hope we can build and strengthen that friendship today.”

Mr. Martin said, “Absolutely, and that’s the whole order of the day.”

The Taoiseach, a Manchester United fan, told Mr Sunak he had just arrived from Manchester, where he met former Red Devil and Ireland international Denis Irwin.

Discussions were expected to focus on the importance of advancing negotiations between the UK and EU on the Northern Ireland protocol and the need to restore the executive there.

It was also the first full face-to-face meeting between Mr Martin and Mr Sunak after speaking briefly at the COP27 summit in Egypt earlier in the week.

At present, relations between the Irish and UK governments are described as stable, and the two are united on key issues and work well together.

The talks tonight will aim to build on that, but will also very much depend on the talks in Brussels and whether or not a deal can be struck before Christmas to resolve the protocol issue.

Mr Sunak was expected to reiterate his commitment to restoring the Northern Ireland executive, and is likely to say he is determined to see that happen as quickly as possible.

The British-Irish Council is made up of representatives of the Irish and UK governments as well as those of Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey.

The lack of a functioning Northern Ireland executive means it will not have official representatives at the two-day event.

While in Blackpool, Mr Martin will also meet members of the Irish community in the north of England and the Mayor of the Liverpool region, Steve Rotheram.

Tánaiste Leo Varadkar told the Dáil that Mr Sunak attending the Anglo-Irish Council “is welcome, and it is a very important gesture and I hope it is a sign of a better relationship to come”.

The Northern Ireland Secretary said ‘today’s meeting between the Prime Minister and the Taoiseach is hopefully part of a very positive reset in the relationship we have with Ireland’.

Speaking to LBC’s Nick Ferrari, Chris Heaton-Harris added: “And indeed have a good reset of relations between James Cleverly and a guy called Maroš Šefčovič, who is the European Commission negotiator for this case.”

He continued: “The problems are that many products are no longer available in Northern Ireland when they are available in England, Scotland and Wales.

“And that’s because the European Commission has basically pushed for potential types of customs controls, going forward, because they’re concerned about the flow of goods from the UK into the European single market.

“So we are absolutely convinced that we can solve this problem by sharing data.”

Asked if we will still be talking about the Northern Ireland protocol in six months, Mr Heaton-Harris said: “My God, I hope not. I mean, it’s a very important thing . It really is. I’m a very good eurosceptic and all, but there are also a lot of other important things to talk about.”

Additional Report AP

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European gas jumps on uncertainty surrounding temporary price cap https://egs-schuetzen.com/european-gas-jumps-on-uncertainty-surrounding-temporary-price-cap/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 08:41:11 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/european-gas-jumps-on-uncertainty-surrounding-temporary-price-cap/ Content of the article (Bloomberg) – Natural gas prices rose amid uncertainty over European Union plans to impose a temporary price cap on imports. Content of the article Benchmark Dutch futures jumped 7.8%, after three losing sessions. The European Commission signaled on Monday that other measures to limit excessive price fluctuations could be more effective […]]]>

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(Bloomberg) – Natural gas prices rose amid uncertainty over European Union plans to impose a temporary price cap on imports.

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Benchmark Dutch futures jumped 7.8%, after three losing sessions. The European Commission signaled on Monday that other measures to limit excessive price fluctuations could be more effective than a cap.

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Read more: EU dampens hopes of price cap to contain soaring gas costs

Traders watched every move in negotiations for a package to contain the crisis. Fears of a worsening situation have eased in recent weeks due to mild weather, an influx of liquefied natural gas and nearly full storage levels. Still, the risk of further supply disruptions remains and temperatures are expected to drop as winter approaches, driving demand for heating.

Political wrangling over a price cap is likely to delay agreement on an emergency package to curb soaring energy prices, EU diplomats say. The bloc’s energy ministers are due to meet and try to hammer out an agreement on the proposal, which would pave the way for separate price cap regulations, on November 24.

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Meanwhile, warmer than usual weather has limited heating demand and delayed withdrawals from storage sites, which are 95.3% full, according to Gas Infrastructure Europe. Forecasts show that above average temperatures in northwestern Europe are expected to persist until the end of the month.

“With gas storage at record levels and with low drawdowns on storage over the past week, levels should continue to remain comfortable,” Alfa Energy said in a research note. “Gas prices in the far curve should continue on a downtrend although slower in recent weeks.”

Dutch first-month gas futures, the European benchmark, were trading up 5.3% at €115.50 per megawatt hour at 10:42 a.m. in Amsterdam. The UK equivalent rose 5.1%.

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Reform of the pro-government media bloc – DW – 04/11/2022 https://egs-schuetzen.com/reform-of-the-pro-government-media-bloc-dw-04-11-2022/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 03:19:07 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/reform-of-the-pro-government-media-bloc-dw-04-11-2022/ ‘Serbia will win,’ headlines ‘Informer’ newspaper, which has the highest circulation in the country and is run by the president’s favorite journalistImage: Rüdiger Rossig/DW If the government-controlled media in Serbia is to be believed, the West takes every opportunity to humiliate and belittle Serbia, and the only effective remedy for this is the country’s brotherly […]]]>
Serbian popular newspapers in a newsstand in Belgrade, August 2022
‘Serbia will win,’ headlines ‘Informer’ newspaper, which has the highest circulation in the country and is run by the president’s favorite journalistImage: Rüdiger Rossig/DW

If the government-controlled media in Serbia is to be believed, the West takes every opportunity to humiliate and belittle Serbia, and the only effective remedy for this is the country’s brotherly friendship with Russia and its close ties with China.

These same media also claim that the EU and the American secret services want to assassinate the Serbian political leader, Aleksandar Vucic.

They also claim that the weakened countries of Western Europe, which they say have abandoned Christian values ​​and replaced them with the LGBTQ community, are doomed. In stark contrast to this, they paint a picture of flawless economic and social conditions in Russia. They are particularly supportive of Russian President Vladimir Putin, who is described as a loving and caring father for the Russian nation.

President Vladimir Putin (left) and Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic shake hands in Belgrade, January 17, 2019
Serbian President Aleksander Vucic (right) is proud of his close ties with Russian President Vladimir PutinImage: picture-alliance/TASS/M. Metzel

Serbian President Vucic is proud of his close ties to Putin, which pro-government media applaud. Recently, he has received broad support from almost the entire Serbian press for his efforts to create a “Serbian bloc” in the style of the pro-Putin United Russia party.

The political elite directly influences the broadcast media

The people of Serbia are exposed to a constant flow of such “news” on a daily basis, as the five television channels that broadcast throughout the country (by far the most important source of news for Serbs) are under the direct influence of the country’s political elite.

With the exception of the Serbian public broadcaster RTS, these channels are run by ever-loyal oligarchs who belong to the close-knit circle of the ruling Serbian Progressive Party (SNS) and President Vucic himself.

Influence of the ruling party in the print media

The situation with the print media is similar. When the Serbian state withdrew from ownership of newspapers such as Politika and Novosti under pressure from the European Union, these outlets were taken over by people close to the president.

The image of President Aleksandar Vucic is seen on four screens
With the exception of Serbian public broadcaster RTS, TV channels that broadcast nationwide in Serbia are run by oligarchs close to the president, according to Thomas BreyImage: N. Rujevic/DW

Informantthe country’s most widely circulated newspaper, is run by Dragan Vucicevic, whom Vucic has repeatedly described as his favorite journalist.

The EU turns a blind eye

But the EU ignores all this because it still sees Vucic as the right negotiating partner. In the latest EU progress report on Serbia, published on October 12, 2022, the issue of media and press freedom is only addressed towards the end of the document. And even then, there is no mention of how the media is used to consolidate power and blacken the reputation of anyone who does not toe the government line. The statements are all general in nature and do not offend anyone.

The drafting of the report was coordinated by the Hungarian European Commissioner for Neighborhood and Enlargement, Oliver Varhelyi, considered pro-Vucic and considered to be Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban’s man in Brussels.

Vucic has repeatedly said reforms will have to wait until alleged threats to the country from Kosovo, Croatia or Bosnian Muslims have been addressed. Media close to the government dutifully repeat this “reason” for regularly delaying reforms.

State-funded advertising for loyal media

According to the University of Belgrade, there are 2,500 media in Serbia, a huge number for a country of this size. Revenues for the entire media sector before the COVID-19 pandemic were estimated at just 210 million euros ($207 million).

European Commissioner Oliver Varhelyi addressing the European Parliament, May 18, 2022
Orban’s man in Brussels? Oliver Varhelyi, Hungarian European Commissioner for Neighborhood and EnlargementImage: Dwi Anoraganingrum/Geisler-Fotopress/picture alliance

Serbian media suffer from a chronic lack of cash. Virtually all media depends on advertising revenue. The state and state-run organizations are by far the largest advertisers in Serbia, and these advertisers only place ads in politically compliant media. The tax authorities are also postponing the huge tax liabilities of acceptable television broadcasters such as Pink, the country’s largest television channel.

Russian news agency helps cash-strapped Serbian media

Sputnik, the Russian state news agency, is taking advantage of the chronic lack of funding in the media sector in Serbia. It opened a large editorial office in Belgrade eight years ago and now makes comprehensive materials freely available to all media. Naturally, this material – in Serbian, used without modification by dozens of media outlets in Serbia – highlights the Russian worldview that the West is sick while Russia is prospering.

All Sputnik reports “prove” that a partnership with Moscow is more beneficial for Serbia than a partnership with Brussels and Washington.

Distraction from scandals

Serbian mainstream media are doing what they can to distract from the many scandals and corruption scandals that have marred Vucic’s ten years in power. These scandals – which involve accusations of arms trafficking, drug cultivation, false speeches by prominent politicians, murder, money laundering, vote buying and embezzlement – have not only been reported by a handful of independent media.

Pro-Russian demonstrators in Belgrade on March 4, 2022, with a large Russian flag and placards with pictures of Vladimir Putin and the letter Z
Most Serbs now see Russia and China as the country’s main donors and trade partners and oppose Serbia’s EU membershipImage: Stefan Stojanovic/REUTERS

Naturally, surveys outside of Serbia’s two main cities, Belgrade and Novi Sad, show that while people in rural areas consider themselves well informed, most know nothing about these scandals.

A distorted view of reality

Serbian media reflect an invented world that has nothing to do with reality. Vucic speaks of the dawn of a “golden age”, as more and more people fall into poverty.

Because of this media propaganda, most Serbs now see Russia and China as the country’s main donors and trade partners and oppose Serbia’s EU membership. But the reality is that about two-thirds of Serbia’s foreign trade has been with the West for decades. Moreover, most of the money entering Serbia in terms of investment comes from the West.

According to polls conducted in June 2022, the majority of young people support Vucic as their national leader and are against the West and in favor of stronger ties with Moscow.

Nevertheless, about half of the respondents want to emigrate because they are not satisfied with the situation in Serbia. Interestingly, hardly anyone wants to go to Russia. Instead, almost all of them want to go to Germany.

This article was originally written in German.

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Europe is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world https://egs-schuetzen.com/europe-is-warming-twice-as-fast-as-the-rest-of-the-world/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:00:24 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/europe-is-warming-twice-as-fast-as-the-rest-of-the-world/ The European continent is bearing the brunt of climate change, warming at twice the rate of the global average, according to a new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The report analyzed 30 years of data from 1991, revealing a disconcerting trend of rapid warming across Europe that is faster than the warming experienced […]]]>

The European continent is bearing the brunt of climate change, warming at twice the rate of the global average, according to a new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

The report analyzed 30 years of data from 1991, revealing a disconcerting trend of rapid warming across Europe that is faster than the warming experienced by any other continent. Average temperatures in Europe have been rising at a rate of 0.5 degrees Celsius (0.9 degrees Fahrenheit) per decade over the study period, reaching a global average of 2.2 degrees C (4 degrees F) above pre-industrial levels. This is well above the limit of 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F) set by the international climatology community in an effort to minimize the devastating environmental effects of climate change.

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More severe COVID-19 may increase risk of long COVID https://egs-schuetzen.com/more-severe-covid-19-may-increase-risk-of-long-covid/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 21:07:50 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/more-severe-covid-19-may-increase-risk-of-long-covid/ A large study published today suggests that people who have more severe COVID-19 symptoms may be more likely to subsequently develop noticeable symptoms 12 weeks or more after initial infection. Additionally, most patients continued to have long COVID, regardless of the severity of their original illness. The study, published by the European Center for Disease […]]]>

A large study published today suggests that people who have more severe COVID-19 symptoms may be more likely to subsequently develop noticeable symptoms 12 weeks or more after initial infection. Additionally, most patients continued to have long COVID, regardless of the severity of their original illness.

The study, published by the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), was based on data collected on pre-Omicron infections. A total of 61 cohort studies from 15 countries were included in the analysis, which included 74,213 post-COVID-19 cases who had been assessed at least 12 weeks after infection in the European Union (EU)/Area European Economic Area (EEA), the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

The systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the prevalence of post-COVID-19 state symptoms, stratified by recruitment setting (community, hospital, and intensive care unit [ICU]) as an indicator of disease severity.

Five post-COVID-19 symptoms – fatigue, shortness of breath, depression, headache and dizziness – were noted to be more common in hospitalized patients than in community settings, suggesting that disease severity is a determining factor who is at risk for developing long COVID.

Long COVID in 51% to 74% of patients

Overall, the authors found very high rates of post-COVID symptoms: the prevalence of any post-COVID-19 symptom was estimated at 50.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.1% to 60.2%) among community-recruited cohorts; 66.5% (95% CI, 56.0% to 76.3%) among hospital-recruited cohorts; and 73.8% (95% CI, 62.3% to 83.9%) among ICU-recruited cohorts.

Community-based patients most often reported at 12 weeks or more impact on quality of life (36.9%), general weakness (31.3%), fatigue (30.8%), shortness of breath (20.9%), depression (17.3%), trouble concentrating (15.6%), headache (14.4%), dizziness (10.2%) and body aches (10.0 %).

For hospitalized patients, the most common symptoms observed after 12 weeks included fatigue (46.1%), shortness of breath (45.4%), depression (23.3%), hair loss (22. 1%) and joint pain (20.0%).

Symptoms have not been assessed for patients in intensive care.

“Still a lot of unknowns”

The report shows a much higher prevalence of long COVID symptoms among patients in community and hospital settings than found in previous studies. Various European and American studies estimate that long COVID affects 1 in 5 to 1 in 8 patients.

“Estimates of symptom prevalence reported here should be interpreted with caution because the majority of included studies lack uninfected comparison groups. The absence of an uninfected comparison group may lead to an overestimation of symptoms attributed to a prior SARS-CoV-2 infection,” the authors wrote.

Regardless, this is one of the largest studies to examine risk factors and disease severity in relation to the development of long COVID.

“There are still many unknowns, in terms of current and future risks to populations for the post-COVID-19 state in the context of increased levels of vaccination and hybrid immunity,” the ECDC said in a statement. press on the report.

“For the future, further large-scale population-based studies with appropriate control groups are needed to assess which long-term symptoms are specifically attributable to SARS-CoV-2 infection and their association with a wide range of demographic and clinical risk factors.

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Sweden’s EU Council Presidency should serve as a driving force behind EU support for Ukraine – Zhovkva https://egs-schuetzen.com/swedens-eu-council-presidency-should-serve-as-a-driving-force-behind-eu-support-for-ukraine-zhovkva/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 20:21:05 +0000 https://egs-schuetzen.com/swedens-eu-council-presidency-should-serve-as-a-driving-force-behind-eu-support-for-ukraine-zhovkva/ Ukrainian President’s Deputy Chief of Staff Ihor Zhovkva had a telephone conversation with Christian Danielsson, Minister for European Affairs in the recently elected government of the Kingdom of Sweden, led by Ulf Kristersson. The relevant statement was made by the office of the President of Ukraine, reports a correspondent of Ukrinform. The parties exchanged views […]]]>

Ukrainian President’s Deputy Chief of Staff Ihor Zhovkva had a telephone conversation with Christian Danielsson, Minister for European Affairs in the recently elected government of the Kingdom of Sweden, led by Ulf Kristersson.

The relevant statement was made by the office of the President of Ukraine, reports a correspondent of Ukrinform.

The parties exchanged views on the situation of Russia’s armed aggression against Ukraine and agreed on the need to increase international pressure on the aggressor country and to do everything possible to preserve European unity on issues related to the international isolation of the Russian Federation, increasing sanctions pressure, and achieving full independence from Russian energy resources.

Zhovkva noted Sweden’s strong political and practical support for Ukraine in defending its independence, as well as its willingness to actively participate in Ukraine’s post-war reconstruction.

The main focus was on Ukraine’s accession to the European Union and on the priorities of the Swedish Presidency of the Council of the EU in the first half of 2023. The parties coordinated their positions on achieving progress of Ukraine on the road to European integration and agreed to deepen the dialogue. in this regard.

“The Swedish Presidency of the Council of the EU should be marked by the start of negotiations on Ukraine’s accession to the European Union and serve as a driving force for continued and comprehensive support for Ukraine by the European community” , Zhovkva pointed out.

The parties agreed on the need for further integration of Ukraine into the EU internal market and the implementation of the necessary reforms. Sweden’s experience in this respect is particularly valuable for Ukraine.

“We hope that we will be able to use Sweden’s practical experience in joining the European Union to make further progress on the road to European integration,” Zhovkva added.

Recall that the Secretary General of NATO, Jens Stoltenberg, underlined the significant contribution of Sweden to Euro-Atlantic security, welcomed its early accession to NATO and thanked the assistance provided by Sweden to help Ukraine fight Russian armed aggression.

Photo: Office of the President of Ukraine

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